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Assassin’s Creed Mirage will bring the series back to its roots in 2023

Assassin’s Creed Mirage, the next entry in Ubisoft’s long-running action-adventure series, will arrive in 2023. The publisher announced the release date today during its Ubisoft Forward event. Set two decades before the events of Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, the game will reunite fans with a Basim Ibn Ishaq and return the series to its stealth roots.

In a briefing held before today’s presentation, Ubisoft Bordeaux, the studio leading development on the project, described Basim as the most agile assassin in franchise history. He’ll have new abilities to assist him in avoiding detection, some of which you can see on display in the cinematic trailer Ubisoft shared today. An integral part of Basim’s kit is Enkidu, his pet eagle. Like Senu in Origins, Enkidu can scout ahead for you to spot potential threats, but new to Mirage is that there will be archers who can spot and take out your feathery friend. In addition to new gadgets, including smoke bombs and poison mines, Basim will also have the ability to briefly slow down time and plot out multiple assassinations.

With the action returning primarily to a single city – Baghdad circa 861 CE – parkour will play a much bigger role than in more recent games. Ubisoft Bordeaux said Basim would be one of the fastest free runners in franchise history, with a move set that includes both new and returning tricks. The story, meanwhile, will focus on The Hidden Ones, the organization that predates the Assassin Brotherhood and will see Shohreh Aghdashloo (The Expanse, Destiny 2) play Basim’s mentor, Roshan.

When it arrives next year, Assassin’s Creed Mirage will be available on PlayStation 4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S, Amazon Luna and PC. In the meantime, fans can look forward to The Last Chapter. The free DLC will arrive later this year and complete the story of Valhalla

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‘Assassin’s Creed Jade’ is a mobile game set in China

Ubisoft is bringing Assassin’s Creed back to mobile devices with Jade, a new title set in China. The game takes place around 215 BC, filling in the timeline between Assassin’s Creed Odyssey and Origins, and it’s designed to feel like a mainline entry, parkouring and all. There’s no release date quite yet and all Ubisoft has shown is the classic eagle-flying-over-a-settlement sequence.

One thing we do know about Jade is that it will support the ability to create your own character, a first for the series. There’s no word on pricing or potential micro-transactions for the game.

Ubisoft has tried to make Assassin’s Creed a thing on mobile devices for nearly as long as the series has existed. The first mobile entry was Assassin’s Creed: Altaïr’s Chronicles, and it came out for the Nintendo DS in 2008, with iOS and Android versions the following year. The original Assassin’s Creed, meanwhile, hit PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in 2007. There have been a handful of mobile-first Assassin’s Creed games since then, but Ubisoft hasn’t released an iOS or Android title tied to the series in four years.

In addition to Jade, Ubisoft is building a game based on the live-action Assassin’s Creed series heading to Netflix. Of course there’s also Assassin’s Creed Mirage, the new mainline title set in the Middle East.

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Codename Red will take the Assassin’s Creed franchise to feudal Japan

The game Assassin’s Creed fans have been asking for years is finally on its way. During its Ubisoft Forward event on Saturday, the publisher revealed Codename Red, a new entry in the series that will be set in feudal Japan. Franchise head Marc-Alexis Côté called Red the “next premium title” in Ubisoft’s open world series and said Ubisoft Quebec was leading work on the project, suggesting it will hew closer to Odyssey than next year’s Mirage.

Côté also shared a teaser for Codename Hexe and called it “a very different type of Assassin’s Creed game.” Ubisoft Montreal, the studio that first created the series is leading development on the project, with Clint Hocking involved as creative director. Hocking may not be a household name, but he’s probably among the most influential designers at Ubisoft, with credits that include Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory and Far Cry 2. According to a recent report from Bloomberg’s Jason Scheier, the game is set during the latter stages of the Holy Roman Empire.

Neither game has a release date yet, but Ubisoft said they would both integrate with Infinity, a service Côté called “not a game per se, but a single entry point into the series.” Ubisoft was cryptic about what Infinity would involve but Côté said the company was exploring the possibility of creating standalone multiplayer experiences within the hub.

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Ubisoft confirms ‘Assassin’s Creed Mirage,’ a stand-alone title in the Middle East

After plenty of leaks, Ubisoft has confirmed that Assassin’s Creed Mirage is the next entry in its long-running series. More details are expected to drop during the Ubisoft Forward event September 10th, but for now we can gleam some tidbits from the announcement image. It shows Basim Ibn Ishaq, a character from the recent Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, leaping with his hidden blade in front of the Palace of the Golden Gate in Baghdad (via Polygon).

That lines up with previous leaks around the game’s setting, which also indicated that Mirage would be a return to stealth gameplay for the series. The new title was originally intended to be DLC for Valhalla, but Bloomberg reports that it was later transformed into a standalone experience to fill out Ubisoft’s release schedule. No matter its conception, it’s nice to see the series return to its Middle Eastern roots. Being a super-powered killing machine in Origins and Valhalla is fun and all, but it’s far from the methodical and less action-heavy gameplay of the earlier AC games (especially the under-rated Origins).

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No, Ubisoft won’t stop you from playing ‘Assassin’s Creed Liberation HD’ on Steam

Assassin’s Creed Liberation HD owners on Steam won’t lose access to the game on September 1st, Ubisoft clarified today after a notice on Valve’s storefront suggested the title would become unplayable later this year. “Current owners of those games will still be able to access, play or redownload them,” a spokesperson for the company told .

The confusion around Liberation HD’s playability stems from an announcement Ubisoft made earlier this month. In a move designed to free up resources for its newer and more popular titles, the company said it planned to , including Liberation HD. As a result of the decision, online features and downloadable content would become unavailable in most of the affected titles. However, the only game Ubisoft said would be completely unplayable was Spade Junkies due to it being a multiplayer-only experience.

Many thought Ubisoft planned to take things a step further when a Twitter user named Nors3 shared a screenshot on Monday of Liberation HD’s Steam page. “Please note this title will not be accessible following September 1st, 2022,” said one of the notices on the game’s storefront listing. The warning prompted many to accuse Ubisoft of dropping to a new low.

Ubisoft told Eurogamer it’s working with Valve and other platform owners to provide more accurate information on the future of the 15 games affected by its decision. “It has always been our intention to do everything in our power to allow those legacy titles to remain available in the best possible conditions for players, and this is what we are working towards,” the company said.

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Ubisoft will drop details on Assassin’s Creed and more games in a September stream

Ubisoft will share updates and announcements about its roster of projects in a showcase on September 10th at 3PM ET. The event will be streamed on Ubisoft channels on YouTube, Twitch and the studio’s official website, and it’ll include news on “multiple games and projects from Ubisoft teams around the world,” according to spokesperson Youssef Maguid.

Back in June, Ubisoft confirmed plans to share information about the future of Assassin’s Creed during a special event in September, and this appears to be that. Ubisoft is currently working on two Assassin’s Creed projects: one is a live multiplayer experience spanning multiple time periods codenamed Infinity, and the other is a standalone series installment codenamed Rift. Early reports indicate Rift started out as an expansion to Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, and it stars Basim Ibn Ishaq from that title.

Alongside Assassin’s Creed, Ubisoft is the caretaker of Far Cry, Rabbids, Beyond Good & Evil, Just Dance, Rainbow Six, Ghost Recon, Splinter Cell, Rayman and Prince of Persia. A remake of the original Prince of Persia has been bouncing around Ubisoft’s studios for a few years and is now in development in Montreal, due out some time after April 2023.

Ubisoft is also hosting a broadcast for its open-world, online pirate simulator Skull and Bones on July 7th at 2PM ET. Skull and Bones has been kicking around since 2017 and it was even playable in 2018, but updates since then have been few and far between.

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Ubisoft will reveal ‘the future of Assassin’s Creed’ this September

Ubisoft will reveal what’s next for its long-running Assassin’s Creed franchise later this year. The publisher announced today it will host a special event in September to discuss the future of the series. While we didn’t get many hints from the company during its recent AC 15th Anniversary Celebration livestream, we have a good idea of what to expect. We know from reporting by Bloomberg’s Jason Schreier that Ubisoft is working on two new Assassin’s Creed projects.

The first is a live service experience codenamed Infinity that will encompass multiple time periods and settings and allow fans to play together. After confirming it was working on the game in July 2021, Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot said this past October that Infinity wouldn’t be a free-to-play game. The company is also working on a new standalone title codenamed Rift. According to Schreier, Rift began life as an Assassin’s Creed Valhalla expansion, but was later repurposed by Ubisoft into a standalone game to bolster its near-term release schedule. The new game will reportedly steer the series back to its stealth roots and star Valhalla’s Basim Ibn Ishaq.

Of the two projects, we’re more likely to see Ubisoft share information about Rift given its more limited scope and the fact Schreier said the company plans to release it before Infinity. Of course, Ubisoft could also surprise us, and we’ll have to wait until September to find out what the company has in store for fans.

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‘Assassin’s Creed Infinity’ game won’t be free-to-play

Assassin’s Creed Infinity won’t be a free-to-play online game, Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot has confirmed during the developer’s latest earnings call. Bloomberg first reported about the project’s existence back in July, and the company has shared details about it bit by bit since then. The publication said that AC Infinity, which is the project’s name that could change upon release, will be a live online service similar to Grand Theft Auto Online that requires you to own the base game. According to Gamespot, Guillemot also said:

“This game is going to have a lot of narrative elements in it. It’s going to be very innovative game, but it will have what players already have in all the other Assassin’s Creed games, all the elements that they love… right from the start. So it’s going to be a huge game. But with lots of elements that already exist in the games that we published in the past.”

Unlike other Assassin’s Creed games with a single narrative story, Infinity will reportedly have multiple settings that will feel and look different from each other but will still be connected in some way. That means Infinity could have several games in one package, though how that will resonate with long-time fans remains to be seen. The original Bloomberg report also called it a massive online platform with room to expand in the months and years after its launch, so we may see new content hit the service as campaigns or seasons. 

Ubisoft pooled its resources and unified the Montreal and Quebec teams, which previously worked on separate Assassin’s Creed titles, to develop Infinity. Guillemot said it’s still in its very early stages, however, and previous reports said its soonest possible release won’t be until 2024.

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Ubisoft keeps up Assassin’s Creed education trend with Discovery Tour: Viking Age

Ubisoft released the educational iteration of their latest big Assassin’s Creed title Valhalla this week. Like each of the other Assassin’s Creed games that’ve been released over the past half-decade, Ubisoft put a significant amount of work in research into the history of our world and humanity to create an authentic experience with their game. The title Discovery Tour: Viking Age takes the work done for Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla, and puts it in an entirely educational package.

Below you’ll see an official trailer for Discovery Tour: Viking Age. Per Ubisoft, this title allows the user to “plunge into a unique interactive experience where you learn about history, traditions, and famous characters of the Viking era.” This title runs from Norway to England, from England to “the mythological Viking realms.”

For those users that already own Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, this Discovery Tour is entirely free. You’ll just need to hit the update button for the game you already have downloaded.

The game Discovery Tour: Viking Age will also be available for download separate from the Assassin’s Creed Valhalla game. You’ll find this title as a PC Standalone version right now, and it’ll be available on other platforms in the year 2022. We’ll know more about exact release dates soon!

At this moment in our real world history, Ubisoft has released three “Discovery Tour” titles. There is one for Ancient Egypt, one for Ancient Greece, and another for the Viking Age. The Viking Age title comes from Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, Greece from AC Odyssey, and Egypt from AC Origins.

In addition to appearing as standalone titles, each Discovery Tour is available as a game mode within its related Assassin’s Creed game. Now, if only we could go back and get the same sort of thing for titles like Assassin’s Creed: Unity for the French Revolution in Paris – that’d make our day.

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The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age

Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tours can offer valuable educational insights into historical periods, and that may be particularly true for the latest instalment. Ubisoft has released a Discovery Tour: Viking Age update for Assassin’s Creed Valhalla that gives you the chance to explore Viking-era England and Norway without the usual conflicts. There’s a new format, however. Rather than go on guided tours and visit exhibits, you assume the roles of four Anglo-Saxon and Viking characters (such as Anglo-Saxon king Alfred the Great and a Viking merchant) as they undertake eight quests that illustrate their daily lives.

You can also study period artifacts from museums in the UK, France and Denmark. And yes, there are rewards to unlock in the main Valhalla game for Eivor and his longship.

The Discovery Tour update is free for Valhalla players on all platforms, and you can buy the $20 stand-alone version for PCs through either Ubisoft’s store or the Epic Games Store. Console and streaming players will have to wait until 2022 for a stand-alone release. However you get a copy, it could be a worthwhile experience if you’ve wanted to dispel the myths surrounding Vikings and their conquests.

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