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Game

Dead by Daylight’s ‘Hooked on You’ dating sim spin-off is out now

Behaviour Interactive is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year and it marked the occasion with a stream that showed off some things it has in the pipeline, including what’s next for Dead by Daylight. Back in May, Behaviour revealed that a DBD dating sim would arrive sometime this summer. Fans can now dive into Hooked on You, since it has just landed on Steam.

Hooked on You is the first DBD spin-off and it was developed by I Love You, Colonel Sanders! studio Psyop. It’s a visual novel in which you can romance four of the killers from the main game on (where else?) Murderer’s Island. The stories it tells combine humor, romance and horror, though they aren’t canon. Still, they could let fans live out some of their DBD fantasies.

As for Dead by Daylight itself, Behaviour shed more light on what to expect from the second Resident Evil chapter, which is coming soon. The Resident Evil: Project W DLC will introduce Albert Wesker (who is called The Mastermind in DBD) and two new survivors: Ada Wong and Rebecca Chambers. In addition, Behaviour is reworking the Raccoon City Police Department map that debuted as part of the original Resident Evil chapter, which arrived last year.

The first Behaviour Beyond showcase included some new game announcements as well. One of them is Meet Your Maker, a base building and raiding game that’s slated to arrive next year. You can assemble deadly maze-like outposts packed with traps and guards to protect sought-after genetic material from other players. Of course, you (perhaps with a friend’s help in co-op mode) will infiltrate other players’ bases to try and steal material from them. A closed playtest starts later this month.

Also on the way is a 3D brawler called Flippin Misfits. Up to four players can battle each other in space. The game will hit Steam in September. In addition, the stream offered a look at a title codenamed Project S. It’s an open-world puzzle game that features single-player, co-op and large multiplayer modes. Behaviour is working on Project S, which it plans to release next year, with Lunarch Studios. More details will be revealed soon.

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Categories
Security

Anti-vax dating site exposed data for 3,500 users through ‘debug mode’ bug

Unsurprisingly, it seems like the type of people who shun vaccinations are not great at preventative cybersecurity either.

As reported by the Daily Dot, “Unjected” — a dating site specifically for people who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 — failed to take basic precautions to keep users’ data secure, leaving sensitive data exposed and allowing potentially anyone to become a site administrator.

The “Unjected” site was set up to leave the administrator dashboard fully accessible to anyone who knew how to look for it. Through this dashboard, an administrator could access user information for any member of the site, including name, date of birth, email address, and (if provided) their home address.

The configuration error was discovered by a security researcher known as GeopJr, who confirmed the vulnerability to the Daily Dot by editing live posts on the site. GeopJr apparently noticed that the site had been published live to the web with “debug mode” switched on — a special set of features for software developers to use while working on the app, which should never be enabled by default in an application that has been deployed.

Using these features, the researcher was able to make almost any change to the site, including adding or removing pages, offering free subscriptions for paid-tier services, or even deleting the entire database of post backups. Currently, the site is believed to have around 3,500 users, all of whose data was accessible through the administrator features.

Though its user base is small, Unjected seems to have big ambitions for building connections among the unvaccinated community. Besides providing dating services, Unjected also offers a “fertility” section where users can offer their semen, eggs, or breastmilk for donation. In another section of the website, users can also sign up for a “blood bank” by listing their location and blood type. Both the blood bank and the fertility services are branded as helping users find “mRNA-free” donors — a reference to the mRNA molecules used in the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines.

The Unjected website is now one of the main portals for the project after the Unjected app was booted from the Apple App Store in August 2021 for violating Apple’s COVID-19 content policies. However, Android users can still download the app if they want: it’s currently still listed on the Google Play store, where it has more than 10K downloads and an average review of 2.5 stars.

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Categories
Game

A Dead by Daylight dating sim will arrive this summer

Behaviour Interactive has shed some light on what’s ahead for its massively popular horror franchise . One of the more surprising announcements was for a spinoff game that will take the horror-heavy series in a completely new direction — it’s a dating sim.

developer Psyop is working on the visual novel, which is called Hooked on You: A Dead by Daylight Dating Sim. Instead of desperately trying to avoid killers like The Trapper and The Spirit, you’ll be able to flirt with them on Murderer’s Island. Just don’t expect to hook up with licensed characters like or .

Behaviour says the stories you’ll discover in Hooked on You won’t be canon, though they’ll offer a blend of humor, romance and — since this is a DBD game after all — horror. The studio notes that many DBD fans have been asking for a dating sim set in that universe. They won’t have to wait too long to play it, either. Hooked on You will arrive on Steam this summer.

A ton of other DBD news has emerged ahead of the game’s sixth anniversary, including details about the next chapter, called Roots of Dread. It includes a new map called Garden of Joy, which is not quite as euphoric as its name suggests.

The latest terrifying killer, The Dredge, is an amorphous mass of limbs that can teleport between lockers to catch survivors unaware. Roots of Dread also introduces a new survivor named Haddie Kaur. PC players can try the chapter on the Public Test Build (PTB) today. It’ll arrive on all platforms on June 7th.

Looking slightly further ahead, Behaviour announced a couple more upcoming crossovers, including an unexpected one with Attack on Titan. The studio says fans have been asking for content based on anime and manga. The first partnership of its kind will soon introduce 10 Attack on Titan-inspired outfits for DBD killers and survivors. Among them are an Eren Yeager skin for Dwight, a Hange-inspired look for Zarina and an Armored Titan outfit for The Oni.

An outfit for Dead by Daylight killer The Oni based on Attack on Titan's Armored Titan

Behaviour Interactive

In addition, DBD is delving back into the world of Resident Evil with another chapter based on that classic franchise. Nemesis, Jill Valentine and Leon S. Kennedy , and more characters from the series will join them later this year as part of the Resident Evil: Project W chapter.

Elsewhere, Dead by Daylight Mobile is getting a major update that will include changes to leaderboards, social systems, the control layout and visual performance. The activities and rewards systems are being revamped too. The update recently debuted in Japan. It will hit the US in a closed beta in the next few weeks before a broader rollout.

Some changes are on the way to the core PC and console game as well. Behavior says it will soon rework around 40 killer and survivor perks to freshen things up. A new system to get folks into games faster will reward those who queue up for whichever role (survivor or killer) has a smaller player count.

Meanwhile, starting today on the PTB, players can try a useful new preset feature. You can create custom loadouts with preferred perks and outfits for killers and survivors. That could help speed things up before you start a match.

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Categories
Tech News

Photorealistic digital humans are taking over dating apps — and stealing your money

In the early months of the COVID-19 shelter-in-place, Cathy Gover joined the dating website Plenty of Fish. Like many people during the pandemic, the Tennessee widow was suffering from the onset of lockdown loneliness and decided to look for love online. It wasn’t long before she met Marc from Atlanta, and fell for his considerable charms. Then, six weeks into their online romance, Marc asked Cathy for financial help.

Of course, you’ve heard this story many, many times before. An older woman looking for love and companionship meets a predator posing as a lonely heart, only to be duped out of thousands of dollars. Sometimes these cases can be frustrating, and leave us asking how the victim missed all the glaring red flags.

In the end, Cathy discovered that the pictures Marc had sent her were actually of a Brazilian pastor. But not before he had relieved her of a cool $3,000 and badly damaged her faith in humankind and, of course, her dampened hopes of finding love again.

[Read: How do you build a pet-friendly gadget? We asked experts and animal owners]

With just a few stolen photographs and a six-week “love bomb” operation, this fraudster was able to extract a significant amount of cash from Cathy and he (if it even was a he) has no doubt done the same thing to scores of others. Now, just imagine how many more he could fool if he was able to create hundreds of original, convincing, and interactive identities at the click of a button.

This scary prospect isn’t as far off as you might think.

Enter the MetaHumans. High-fidelity digital humans that can be created “in minutes” with the help of a new tool from Epic Games — the MetaHuman Creator — that promises to “will empower anyone to create a bespoke photorealistic digital human, fully rigged and complete with hair and clothing.”

Though not yet perfect, these digital creations are still pretty uncanny and demonstrate just how far this kind of technology has come.

Obviously, Epic’s primary audience for this impressive tool is creators in the gaming, movie, and wider entertainment industries, and we can only imagine what fantastical experiences they will use to create, but we also shouldn’t rule out its malicious use. Particularly in this new, more virtual world that often relies on remote video communication more heavily than in-person interaction.

As a species that has thus far evolved to trust our senses, but we need to slowly unlearn the idea that “seeing is believing.” At the same time, more serious thought should go into how we get ahead of a future in which legions of these MetaHumans (and their equivalents) are unleashed online to mislead and defraud those who cannot identify them as fakes.

But even if governments were able to regulate in a way that would block or deter the weaponization of this technology (which seems unlikely), we should also take pause to think about how we feel about the legitimate, transparent use of these phony humans outside of the narrow world of movies and video games.

Might they replace humans in commercials, or even in the classroom? Would you have one read your kids a bedtime story? Could they model clothes without tripping up on virtual runways, or host the next online conference you attend without a hitch? There are many possibilities, but each heralds the redundancy of a real human being. It makes you wonder why we are so hell-bent on creating tech in our own image when it could be the ultimate act of self-sabotage…

Even if we choose to dismiss as fantasy the idea that digital humans will infiltrate our daily lives in the near-term, we should not overlook that for much younger generations concepts like this — along with fake news and deepfakes and tech like GPT-3 — will be part of their understanding of the world. They are altogether less “creeped out” by AI, and its creations, and more likely to engage with bots in all guises. As such, we have a real responsibility to think about how we want these tools to be deployed and which lines we should prevent them from crossing… even if it does all feel a little Dr. Who.

This article was originally published on You The Data by Fiona J McEvoy. She’s a tech ethics researcher and the founder of YouTheData.com.

Published February 18, 2021 — 11:55 UTC



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