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Game

Bungie sues ‘Destiny 2’ YouTuber who issued almost 100 fake DMCA claims

In December of last year, a YouTuber by the name of Lord Nazo received copyright takedown notices from CSC Global — the brand protection vendor contracted by game creator Bungie — for uploading tracks from their game Destiny 2’s original soundtrack. While some content creators might remove the offending material or appeal the copyright notice, Nazo, whose real name is Nicholas Minor, allegedly made the ill-fated decision to impersonate CSC Global and issue dozens of fake DMCA notices to his fellow creators. As first spotted by The Game Post, Bungie is now suing him for a whopping $7.6 million.

“Ninety-six times, Minor sent DMCA takedown notices purportedly on behalf of Bungie, identifying himself as Bungie’s ‘Brand Protection’ vendor in order to have YouTube instruct innocent creators to delete their Destiny 2 videos or face copyright strikes,” the lawsuit claims, “disrupting Bungie’s community of players, streamers, and fans. And all the while, ‘Lord Nazo’ was taking part in the community discussion of ‘Bungie’s’ takedowns.” Bungie is seeking “damages and injunctive relief” that include $150,000 for each fraudulent copyright claim: a total penalty of $7,650,000, not including attorney’s fees.

The game developer is also accusing Minor of using one of his fake email aliases to send harassing emails to the actual CSC Global with the subject lines such as “You’re in for it now” and “Better start running. The clock is ticking.” Minor also allegedly authored a “manifesto” that he sent to other members of the Destiny 2 community — again, under an email alias — in which he “took credit” for some of his activities. The recipients promptly forwarded the email to Bungie.

As detailed in the lawsuit, Minor appears to have done the bare minimum to cover his tracks: the first batch of fake DMCA notices used the same residential IP address he used to log-in to both his Destiny and Destiny 2 accounts, the latter of which shared the same Lord Nazo username as his YouTube, Twitter and Reddit accounts. He only switched to a VPN on March 27th — following media coverage of the fake DMCA notices. Meanwhile, Minor allegedly continued to log-in to his Destiny account under his original IP address until May.

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Categories
Game

CD Projekt Red leverages DMCA to kill tweets that link to stolen game data

CD Projekt Red is a video game developer that’s behind one of the most infamous video games of 2020, Cyberpunk 2077. That game was very highly anticipated but launched with such massive problems that it turned into a liability for its developer and angered gamers worldwide who had waited years to play the game. The company announced not long ago that hackers had accessed its servers and stolen game data that was leaked online.

As you might expect, there have been several users who are linking to that stolen data via Twitter and other social networks. CD Projekt Red has reportedly been using DMCA takedown requests to eliminate tweets that link to that stolen data. Reports indicate that last Thursday, at least two Twitter users were notified of DMCA takedown requests via email from a copyright monitoring firm.

Reports indicate that the emails listed descriptions of the infringement that included linking to illegally obtain source code of Gwent: The Witcher Card Game that reposted without authorization and wasn’t intended to be released publicly. One person whose tweet linking to the material was taken down said that the link led to a torrent to allow others to download the source code.

The DMCA takedown notice targeted at least three other Twitter users. They had tweets replaced by a standard Twitter message noting the content had been removed in response to a report from the copyright holder. CD Projekt Red announced that it had been hacked last week and posted a screenshot of the ransom request demanded by the hackers.

The game developer has refused to cooperate with the hackers and has paid no ransom. The hackers are reportedly trying to sell other data they obtained during their attack.

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