Categories
Computing

3 things you didn’t know you could do with Google Drive

When it comes to Google apps, most people look for hidden features in Docs, new features in Sheets, or interesting features in Slides. But Google Drive, the central hub for the documents from all those apps, has its own set of features.

Here are a few features of Google Drive that you may not know exist because they’ve popped up over time and under the radar.

See file locations

Just like on Windows and Mac, you may want to see the spot where a file resides by viewing the file path. In Google Drive, you can see the exact location of a file. This is helpful for opening the correct file when multiple files have similar names, as well as for jumping directly to a folder that holds a file.

Step 1: You can view the location of a file in Recent, Starred, Trash, and Search. So, open one of these areas using the left-hand navigation.

Step 2: On the right side of the file list, you’ll see a column for Location.

Step 3: Hover your cursor over the file location. When the pop-up appears, select a spot in the path to go directly to it.

Alternatively, select a file and view the full path at the bottom of the screen. You can also select a place in the path to go to it.

File path at the bottom of Google Drive.

This feature arrived in June 2022 for all Google Drive users.

Search for Google Meet content

If you use Google Meet for video calls and meetings with your team, then you may head to Google Drive for items related to that meeting. Instead of searching through folders and files, you can find all Google Meet content in Drive using a simple search.

Go to the Search field at the top of Google Drive and type: app:”Google Meet”. Press Enter or Return and you’ll see all the results of your Google Meet search.

This gives you quick access to things like recordings, transcripts, reports, and notes.

Google Meet search results in Google Drive.

Google introduced this handy feature to all Drive users in May 2022.

Cut, copy, and paste files with shortcuts

One more somewhat hidden feature of Google Drive that’s worth checking out is shortcuts. You can cut, copy, and paste files throughout Google Drive using the Google Chrome browser. This lets you easily move a file from one spot to another or create a copy of it in a shared folder.

Step 1: Select a file you want to move (cut) or copy. You cannot currently use the shortcuts for cutting or copying folders, only files.

  • On Windows, press Ctrl + X to cut or Ctrl + C to copy.
  • On Mac, press Command + X to cut or Command + C to copy.

You’ll see a brief message on the bottom-left of the window that you’ve cut or copied a file.

File copied message in Google Drive.

Step 2: Navigate to the spot in Google Drive where you want the cut or copied file.

Step 3: Press Ctrl + V on Windows or Command + V on Mac to paste the file. You’ll see a brief message on the bottom-left of the window that you’ve moved a file or created a copy of a file.

File pasted message in Google Drive.

Like the Google Meet search above, this feature popped onto the scene in May 2022 for all Drive users.

These sort of secret Google Drive features are handy ones to keep in mind. Whether you need a file location, Google Meet content, or want to move or copy a file in a hurry, remember these convenient features.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Computing

Google finally makes sharing easier in Docs and Drive

Google rolled out an update to Docs and Drive today that makes sharing files a little bit simpler. As originally reported by 9to5Google, the new Share menu is considerably smaller, and all of its elements are more compact and better organized.

The first thing you will notice is that “Share with people” and “Get link” have been condensed to one box. In the last version, Sharing with individual people was its own stand-alone box, with another box for link sharing directly beneath it. In the new Share interface, the “Get link” box has been entirely removed, and now you can simply copy the link with the button in the bottom left corner. It’s cleaner, removes a lot of needless text, and is far easier to find than before.

The “Share with people section” is largely unchanged. It has been retitled “People with access,” but otherwise the steps for sharing files with individual people are unchanged. Below that is the new “General access” section, which lets users adjust who can view the link. It can be set to restricted (where only the people added can view the link), a specific workspace ( a set group of users, like a company), or to anyone with the link. These settings used to be in the “Get link” section.

The “Copy link” button is directly below general access, as we covered above.

There is also a setting shortcut in the top-right corner that adjusts user settings. Those settings are:

  • Editors can change permissions and share
  • Viewers and commenters can see the option to download, print, and copy

Toggling these off restricts sharing and permission changes to the original file creator, and it restricts viewers from downloading, printing, or copying the document (at least conveniently).

Overall, these are useful changes to the sharing UI. Consolidating the Copy link button, in particular, is going to save a lot of people looking around for a commonly used feature.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Sega’s Mega Drive Mini 2 includes Sega CD games

is set to relive some of its past glories once again with another retro console. The company has announced the . While the system has only been confirmed for Japan for now, it seems likely Sega will bring it to other markets as well. If and when it comes to the US, it’ll probably be called the Genesis Mini 2.

The Mega Drive Mini 2 will include Sega CD games in its of 50 titles. The full list hasn’t been revealed, but it includes , Virtua Racing and Shining Force CD. It also features , which was never released on Mega Drive/Genesis — it was an arcade title that arrived on Master System. It’s worth noting the library may be different in other countries.

Sega says all of the games have been faithfully reproduced. You’ll be able to save your progress at any point too.

The company will release the Mega Drive Mini 2 in Japan on October 27th. It will cost ¥9,980 (around $75). Sega is also making a cosmetic attachment that looks like an adorably smaller version of the Sega CD accessory. Using an included spacer, you can mount the original Mega Drive Mini, which is slightly larger than its successor, as well. The Sega CD attachment will cost ¥4,500 (roughly $37).

We were big fans of the , which Sega released in 2019. It had a solid selection of games that were adeptly emulated and USB ports that allowed users to plug in alternate controllers. Fingers crossed Sega includes the six-button version of its controller when it inevitably offers the Mega Drive Mini 2 outside of Japan.

Sega Mega Drive Mini 2

Sega

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
AI

Report: Data and enterprise automation will drive tech and media spending to $2.5T

Join gaming leaders, alongside GamesBeat and Facebook Gaming, for their 2nd Annual GamesBeat & Facebook Gaming Summit | GamesBeat: Into the Metaverse 2 this upcoming January 25-27, 2022. Learn more about the event. 


According to a new report released by Activate Consulting, the global technology and media spend will balloon to $2.5 trillion by 2025.  This analysis comes as 2021 netted a spend of more than $2 trillion.

The report indicates that one of the major drivers of this tech boom will be data solutions and enterprise automation.  According to the report, “Activate Technology and Media Outlook for 2022,” a set of new companies are paving the way for the future, delivering infrastructure, tools, and applications that will enable all enterprises to operate and innovate as if they were major technology companies.

Businesses and consumers can expect to see accelerated development of customer experiences, better (faster, less bureaucratic) employee experiences, improved intelligence and decision-making, and improved operational and financial efficiency as a result.  Technology like autonomy (self-driving cars, home automation), voice recognition, AR/VR, gaming and more will enable end-user experiences while enterprises will become more productive in their marketing effectiveness, IT service management, cross-planning and forecasting, and more.

New data startups are spurring the next era of innovation.  They’re focusing on leveraging data and information, improving end-user experience, and improving storage and connectivity — all of which will drive the business-to-business and business-to-consumer experiences of the future.

Event

The 2nd Annual GamesBeat and Facebook Gaming Summit and GamesBeat: Into the Metaverse 2

Learn More

According to the report, more than 80% of the companies driving this innovation are U.S.-based, half of which are headquartered in the Bay Area.  They’re growing fast thanks to large venture capital infusions – and many of these startup companies have scaled at an unprecedented pace.  Fifteen of them have raised more than $1 billion since their launch.

In order for the next generation of companies to reach their full potential, the report indicates they must zero in on three specific areas of focus: strategy and transformation, go-to-market pricing, as well as their sales and marketing approach.

Read the full report by Activate Consulting.

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact.

Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Fortnite Challenge: Drive an IO Vehicle With Off-road Tires

It’s time once again for another set of Fortnite challenges, this time for season 7, week 9. The new challenges are all over the place in terms of complexity, though you shouldn’t have too many difficulties getting through them as long as you’re familiar with the new features for this season. One challenge that might cause trouble is for driving an IO vehicle with off-road tires. The act of completing the challenge isn’t tough, but actually finding the required materials can be tricky if you don’t know where to go.

In this guide, we’ll show you everything there is to know about completing the latest challenge. Here’s how to drive an IO vehicle with off-road tires in Fortnite.

Recommended reading:

Where to find IO vehicles

Fortnite.gg

IO vehicles are found at satellite stations around the map. These are somewhat like fortresses that are home to IO guards, deadly NPCs who will attack you on sight. The map above (thanks, Fortnite.gg) shows all the locations of the satellite stations. In general, we advise you to visit whichever one is farthest away from the path of the Battle Bus. That way, you’re less likely to run into enemy players. It’s hard enough to deal with the IO guards at each station, so try to avoid other players if possible.

Once you arrive, you’ll want to look for a garage that houses an IO vehicle. The vehicles are black and often parked inside, but we have seen them spawn outside as well. As you search for the vehicles, also be on the lookout for gear like weapons and shields so you’re prepared if an IO guard comes after you.

How to equip them with off-road tires

IO vehicle with off-road tires in Fortnite.

The garages (as pictured above) often have a shelf full of tires. Smash the shelf with your pickax and then pick up the item that drops. This will allow you to throw the tire onto the vehicle, which will convert it to an off-road car needed to complete the challenge. If you can’t find them in the garage where the vehicle spawned, look for another garage. There is typically more than one at each base.

From here, drive the vehicle around the map. To complete the challenge, you must drive 1,000 meters in the off-road IO vehicle, which shouldn’t be tough as long as you stay away from enemies. It’s a good idea to avoid high-traffic areas while aiming to complete this challenge. And if for some reason you do get taken out before you reach 1,000 meters traveled, your progress carries over from match to match, so you can easily try again.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
AI

Bluecore raises $125M to drive retail customer retention with big data

All the sessions from Transform 2021 are available on-demand now. Watch now.


Bluecore, a marketing technology company that helps some of world’s biggest retailers “transform casual shoppers into lifetime customers,” has raised $125 million in a series E round of funding at a $1 billion valuation.

Founded in 2013, Bluecore helps direct-to-consumer (D2C) retailers match first-party shopper data with product interactions, enabling them to design personalized mass-marketing communications through email, ecommerce platforms, and other digital ad channels. The New York-based company works with hundreds of enterprise-grade retailers, including Gap, Nike, Teleflora, Tommy Hilfiger, and CVS Pharmacy.

Retention

The problem Bluecore is setting out to solve is the age-old conundrum of how companies and brands can improve their repeat customer metrics.

“There are a number of challenges for retail, but if you peel back the layers and look at the core, the primary issue is that 80% of customers only ever buy from a retailer once,” Bluecore CEO Fayez Mohamood told VentureBeat. “This is particularly an issue for enterprise retailers, because the larger a retailer gets, the larger the revenue potential that lies in retention is.”

While retailers of all sizes naturally want loyal customers, Mohamood argues that the stakes are higher for larger ones — such as Nike, Gap, Foot Locker, Lululemon, and Jockey — that have withstood the test of time and evolved.

“If you look at brands that have endured, you’ll realize that they’re the ones that people keep buying from,” Mohamood said. “This isn’t random — they’ve made retention and shopper loyalty a key strategy for revenue growth.”

Data is the new oil

Technology plays a major role in helping companies not only “go digital,” but scale by leveraging vast swathes of data. Bluecore is all about driving revenue by growing “purchase frequency, cart size, and conversions through personalization,” according to Mohamood. This involves meshing real-time shopper data with product data in a single system.

Bluecore captures shopper activity, such as what they’re searching for, clicking on, adding to carts, abandoning, and so on, and combines this with in-store transactions and other data. This culminates in the amalgamation of disparate datasets into a single unified view spanning shopper identity and behavior and product catalog.

“Using this dataset, we can immediately automate actions across channels with the goal of continuously creating matches between each individual shopper and the products they’ll love,” Mahmood said.

Bluecore’s platform constitutes three main elements: Bluecore Communicate, which is concerned with automating personalized customer communications; Bluecore Advertise, which uses predictive modeling to target new and existing customer segments on paid media channels such as Facebook, Instagram, and Google Ads; and Bluecore Site, which uses predictive signals to deliver personalized marketing campaigns.

At the heart of these products is data, which has often been described as today’s most valuable resource — more so than oil — given the role it plays in driving all manner of business decisions.

“When traditional retailers go digital and digital brands scale, they have to focus as much on customer retention as acquisition,” Mohamood continued. “Fortunately, digital offers a data-rich environment for connecting shoppers to the next-best product that gets them to buy again and again.”

Above: Bluecore: Discount purchases over the past 12 months

Show me the money

Bluecore had previously raised around $113 million, and with another $125 million from investors including Georgian, FirstMark, Norwest, and Silver Lake Waterman, the company said it’s now well-financed to invest in further ecommerce product development and in AI and analytics.

More importantly, Bluecore is also better positioned to challenge legacy marketing clouds from the likes of Oracle, Adobe, and Salesforce with a more targeted offering built specifically for direct-to-consumer (D2C) retailers.

“We built our technology for the world of online shopping — and more specifically, for the unique use cases of retail, such as the need to create repeat purchases, preserve margins, and guide shoppers through product discovery,” Mohamood said.

Moreover, the global pandemic was a major driver of digital transformation, with countless traditional retailers forced into declaring bankruptcy or downsizing their brick-and-mortar presence — it’s all about e-commerce now.

“In 2020, the whole world moved to digital shopping,” Mohamood added. “This was a major wake-up call to those omnichannel, enterprise retailers who still did the majority of their sales in-store and didn’t consider their ecommerce sites primary revenue generators.”

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact.

Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
AI

CapGemini on the potential of data ecosystems to drive business value

Join executive leaders at the Data, Analytics, & Intelligent Automation Summit, presented by Accenture. Watch now!


Companies can learn a lot from each other’s data. By sharing, exchanging and collaborating with data, in what Capgemini calls data ecosystems, organizations would be able to generate more revenue, boost customer satisfaction, improve productivity, and reduce costs.

CapGemini’s chief data architect, Steve Jones, and artificial intelligence and analytics group offer leader Anne-Laure Thieullent discussed the business impact of AI and data ecosystems with Maribel Lopez, founder and principal analyst at Lopez Research, during VentureBeat’s Transform 2021 virtual conference on Monday.

Mastering data

The CapGemini Research Institute released a report on analyzing companies’ grasp of data. The report focused on two factors — data behaviors and technology. Data behaviors refers to how companies use technology to make decisions and how development of data literacy skills are set up through the business to democratize the use of data, Thieullent explained. The second factor looks at the the technology the companies used, or how they have progressed in using machine learning techniques on their values forecasts or analytics.

CapGemini’s researchers found that only 16% of organizations could be classified as advanced along both factors. These so-called data masters are 22% more profitable than their peers, and they generated 70% more revenue on average per employee, the report found.

Taking data and AI systems seriously

When did companies begin to take data and AI seriously? Part of the interest came about because of the hype around AI, Thieullent said.

“With the fear that jobs like legal, marketing, HR, and finance are going to be disrupted by AI and automation, business leaders have started to really get into tech and understand how they could master their own destiny,” Thieullent said.

Many businesses have also become more interconnected. For example, retailers that want to understand their customers’ buying patterns can learn a lot by looking at the data collected by their logistic partners. In the pharmaceutical industry, companies can learn from each other’s research and development efforts.

“What if you could learn from drug discovery data from many pharma companies in order to bring to market safer drugs faster?” Thieullent asked.

Recognizing the value of data ecosystems

Thieullent defined a data ecosystem as “partnerships among organizations that allow them to share data and insights to create new value.” The potential of ecosystem-based data sharing can reach more than 9% of the total annual revenue of an organization, she noted.

Companies that deeply engage in data ecosystems generate more sales from fixed assets and twice the market capitalization, Thieullent said.

The benefits also go beyond finances: CapGemini found that data ecosystems can improve customer satisfaction by 15%, increase efficiency by 14%. and reduce annual costs by 11%.

One of the reasons companies began sharing data was because they saw what AI can do with the data, CapGemini’s Jones said. For instance, forecasting the supply chain can involve data related to weather, logistics, and manufacturing. This kind of interconnectivity has pushed companies to look beyond the limitations of their businesses.

“They’re recognizing that they can actually have business decisions and make optimizations which are driven by things that aren’t under their control, that aren’t what they know,” Jones said.

Starting internally

Companies should start from within, and consider what success looks like for different teams and striking a balance. For the chief information officer, it’s about changing people’s mindsets to think of data as an asset and not just what system or table the data comes from, Jones said.

Jones’ advice: “Stop sweating the data technology. Stop sweating the infrastructure technologies. Industrialization, standardization, and looking at how you govern data as an asset, not table storage mechanisms.”

Thieullent urged companies to start thinking about the data they don’t have and who they can work with to get it. “Think of what you could do if you had access to the data to better know your end customer and build new products,” she said.

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact.

Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

‘Test Drive Unlimited Solar Crown’ arrives September 22nd, 2022

Test Drive Unlimited Solar Crown, the long-awaited third open-world entry in the Test Drive series, at last has a release date, but fans are in for quite the wait. Publisher Nacon plans to release the game on September 22nd, 2022.

The company made the announcement during a Nacon Connect livestream. Developer KT Racing says the automotive MMO will take place in Hong Kong, following the Oahu and Ibiza settings of previous games, and it’s recreating the region in a 1:1 scale. Along with urban areas, you can expect to explore forests, mountains, marshes and beaches.

The game will feature a racing tournament as well as a conflict between two clans, the Streets and the Sharps. You’ll join one of them, try to rise through the ranks and attempt to overthrow your rival clan. More details about the first Test Drive Unlimited game in over a decade will emerge in the coming months.

Meanwhile, Nacon and developer Daedalic provided another look at The Lord of the Rings: Gollum, which is scheduled to arrive in fall 2022. It mixes stealth and parkour, and takes place in parts of Middle-earth that you might not have seen before. You’ll encounter some other familiar characters, including Legolas’ father Thranduil and Gandalf.

There was also an announcement and brief teaser for RoboCop: Rogue City, in which the legendary cyborg is tasked with cleaning up the streets of Old Detroit. It’s a first-person shooter from developer Teyon and it’s coming to PC and consoles in 2023.

Elsewhere, Nacon revealed Steelrising, from Greedfall studio Spiders, will arrive next June. Vampire: The Masquerade – Swansong and Blood Bowl 3 have been delayed to 2022, however.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
AI

The lessons we learn from self-driving will drive our robotics future

Where does your enterprise stand on the AI adoption curve? Take our AI survey to find out.


Robotics is entering an exponential growth phase. There are increasingly new and diverse applications for robots, both the inspiring and the mundane. Just within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic response, robots have been deployed in novel ways — disinfecting public spaces, handling infectious materials, and providing medical care to patients.

But the horizon for new robotics applications is ever expanding, and it is AV (autonomous vehicle) development that will further accelerate this growth. Why? Because the challenge that self-driving cars present is the same challenge that acts as a barrier for most other kinds of robots. The AV industry, with its concentration of talent, infrastructure, and capital, is primed to meet this challenge.

The autonomy challenge

Even as the use of robots has become more widespread, its applications have remained somewhat limited. For decades, one-armed giants performed highly scripted tasks and were built for a single purpose, like spot welding or adding threads to the end of a pipe. They were not flexible enough to perform a variety of tasks or respond well in unstructured environments. Even when deployed in less structured environments, like those used in surgical settings or even aerial drones, robots have functioned primarily as a remote-controlled extension of a human actor, with limited autonomy.

AVs, on the other hand, inherently require a great deal of autonomy; there is literally no human being behind the wheel, and the stakes are high. AVs need the ability to sense, plan, and act in highly dynamic, unstructured environments such as the chaotic streets of San Francisco. They need to respond to humans — other drivers, pedestrians, cyclists, that guy on a motorized skateboard — and make collaborative decisions with them.

Consider one of the common yet more challenging traffic scenarios that humans regularly encounter: a four-way stop. Despite the laws that govern how drivers should stop and proceed in their turn, the reality is that most of the time, people navigate these intersections via nonverbal communication with each other. They make eye contact, nod, wave each other on. Without the capacity to communicate using these cues, an AV must still decipher the intent of other drivers and communicate its own — for instance, creeping forward slowly to convey its intent to proceed through the intersection — all while obeying traffic laws and making safety-critical decisions. This choreography cannot be scripted in advance. AV decision-making must conform to human-like social expectations in real time based on the current situation and potential evolution of all the relevant actors in the scene, including itself, for some time into the future.

The crux of the challenge involves making decisions under uncertainty; that is, choosing actions based on often imperfect observations and incomplete knowledge of the world. Autonomous robots have to observe the current state of the world (imperfect observations), understand how this is likely to evolve (incomplete knowledge), and make decisions about the best course of action to pursue in every situation. This cognitive capability is also essential to interpersonal interactions because human communications presuppose an ability to understand the motivations of the participants and subjects of the discussion. As the complexity of human–machine interactions increases and automated systems become more intelligent, we strive to provide computers with comparable communicative and decision-making capabilities. This is what takes robots from machines that humans supervise to machines with which humans can collaborate.

Where human-robot collaboration can take us

As robotics has grown as an industry, costs have fallen, enabling adoption across a broad variety of contexts. In some cases, the technology is familiar but the application is novel. While drones aren’t new, companies deploying them to inspect power lines or to collect information for insurance claims is. Same for the one-armed giants now employed as hotel concierges or baristas instead of spot welders.

Commerce has benefited greatly from automation. Materials handling in particular has been ripe for automation via self-guided vehicles, largely because it’s such a dangerous sector for human workers. Robots equipped with lidar, cameras, and a bevy of other sensors — like those that enable AVs’ perception systems — can safely and quickly navigate loading docks and factory floors while avoiding collisions with workers. These robots, however, still rely on a fairly structured and predictable environment (markers on the ground help them navigate) and lack dynamic responsiveness. During the last few years, some have argued that injuries in some fulfillment centers have resulted from robots moving at a faster pace than the humans working alongside them.

Robotics in healthcare environments has become commonplace, too. Robot-assisted surgical systems like Intuitive’s da Vinci are used in 90% of prostatectomies instead of traditional laparoscopic tools. But robots are increasingly valuable not just in the operating room but throughout hospitals and nursing homes, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Robots are helping caregivers lift patients and performing other tasks as well as providing social interaction to the elderly. Robotics have increasingly been used with children as well, not just as trendy tech toys but legitimate STEM educational tools. Research into the treatment of children with autism using emotive robots has gained traction in recent years.

AV development is key

With more players in the field and increasing adoption, the $100+ billion global robotics sector has been growing by leaps and bounds, and according to IDC is expected to triple by the end of 2021. Much of this can be attributed to driver-assistance technologies now common in new vehicles, especially those at the higher end of the market. Companies developing fully autonomous technology, however, are poised to push the robotics envelope in the automotive industry and beyond.

As AV companies meet the challenge of human-robot collaboration at the level required to bring self-driving vehicles to market, the horizon for leveraging these solutions for other robotics applications only expands. Like a chess grandmaster, an AV must consider multiple possible moves and countermoves both for itself and other traffic participants and then make safety-critical decisions in a noisy and rapidly changing environment. It needs to take into account context like traffic laws and local norms; driving in a city like Houston is not the same as navigating Hong Kong. And a successful AV has to communicate its goals and its intent to humans in a way that feels natural and intuitive.

Developing the kind of decision-making needed for AVs to succeed will unlock complex “critical thinking” for other robotic applications, allowing a greater degree of autonomy and human-robot collaboration in both new and familiar use cases. Physical agents that can autonomously generate engaging, life-like behavior will lead to safer and more responsive robots. The shift from humans supervising robots to collaborating with them is the way forward for both AVs and the sector at large.

Rashed Haq is Vice President of Robotics at Cruise.

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact.

Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Security

Google Drive and YouTube sharing will change in July

Soon, public links to an untold number of items stored on Google Drive and YouTube will stop working. In the name of enhanced security, Google is changing the way it handles link sharing on both services, and while active users may be able to opt out of the switch, files and videos abandoned on unused or inactive accounts may simply slip out of view forever.

That’s because shared links are now part of a newer system that Google says increases security. On YouTube, the newer links are apparently more difficult for anyone to guess or access without being explicitly given access. The newer links also have the affect of tying more activity to specific accounts and requiring viewers to log in, which allows access to be tracked and made a part of each user’s profile.

On YouTube the changes will affect any videos that are public, but marked as “Unlisted.” As described in a blog post and five-minute video, any Unlisted videos that were uploaded prior to 2017 will have their status changed to Private starting on July 23rd. The way Private videos work now, that will kill any old links or embeds, plus it limits sharing to a maximum of 50 people — all of whom will need a Google account to view it.

For people who would prefer to keep sharing their old Unlisted videos with public links, embeds and comments, they can opt out on a per-account basis by filling out this form over the next month. The only other option is to reupload those videos and leave them marked as Unlisted.

Google Drive is going through the same change, as announced earlier today on the Workspace Updates blog. Clicking a link to access cloud-stored files will now include a resource key that determines who does or does not get access. If you’ve already accessed a file (presumably while logged in to your Google account) then you will continue to have access to it, and if you have “direct access,” then that will continue to work.

Google Drive security update email

Google Drive security update email

If that is not the case, then you’ll need to make a request to access the file or folder. If you have a personal Google/Gmail account and use Drive, then you’ll get an email after July 26th alerting you to any files that will be impacted by this change. If your account includes links that will be affected, then you’ll be able to opt out of the “security update” as long as you do so before September 13th, 2021.

If you use a Google Workspace account managed by your employer, school or other organization then it’s a little more complicated. The administrator/IT department can choose to opt out entirely, apply the update to everyone with no opt-out possible, or apply the update and allow individual users to remove it from specific files.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link