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Security

iPod Hack Puts 50 Million Spotify Songs in Your Pocket

When the iPod music player launched in 2001, Apple went with the slogan, “1,000 songs in your pocket.”

Skip forward 20 years and a brilliant bit of work by Massachusetts resident Guy Dupont puts 50 million songs in your pocket, streamable via Spotify.

The project started when Dupont got his hands on a 17-year-old iPod after receiving it from a relative who was presumably having a Marie Kondo moment. In a YouTube video spotted by Gizmodo, the talented tech tinkerer explains how he tore the guts out of Apple’s music player so he could replace it with more modern components that enabled him to incorporate Spotify.

The new parts include a $10 Wi-Fi- and Bluetooth-capable Raspberry Pi Zero W computer, a $40 display, and a $7 rechargeable battery.

The device works pretty much in the same way as the original iPod, with the click wheel allowing you to speedily select a music track — only now can choose one from Spotify’s vast library. Another difference is that instead of those tiny audible clicks that you used to hear with the wheel, the addition of a haptic motor means that the device now vibrates instead.

Some of the video (top) shows Dupont carefully putting the device together. He also talks about the three pieces of software that helped to make his creation work — two of which he wrote himself — and offers heartfelt thanks to the writer of a 10-year-old blog post that offered some crucial information that allowed him to get the click wheel to work, a breakthrough that was vital to the task’s success. “This project would not have been remotely as interesting if I couldn’t have gotten the original click wheel to work,” Dupont says in the video.

In a Hackaday article explaining the building process in more detail, Dupont says, “I had forgotten how good it feels to hold and use one of these things. Naturally, I decided to modify one. I wanted to supply some modern features (streaming, search, Bluetooth audio, etc), while paying homage to the amazing user experience that Apple originally released almost 20 years ago.”

Dupont finishes up by noting that while his video may seem like an ad for Spotify, the best way to support artists is to buy their music instead of streaming it, and also to purchase their merchandise.

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Tech News

Xiaomi’s Air Charge tech looks magical — but I have a million questions

I wouldn’t be surprised if right now, in an office in China, a bunch of Xiaomi employees are jumping up and down and yelling, “Suck it Apple!” The company just revealed that it has invented a device that wirelessly charges your devices over the air.

What Xiaomi has claimed to achieve is long-distance wireless charging. The company claimed it could charge several devices at once at up to 5 watts (which isn’t much). It hasn’t specified the Mi Air Charger’s range, but it said that it can work across “several meters.”

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AI

Verusen raises $8 million to reconcile supply chain data using AI

Atlanta, Georgia-based Verusen, a startup leveraging AI to build a connected supply chain, today raised $8 million in series A funding co-led by Forte Ventures and Flyover Capital. The company says it’ll put the funds toward R&D as it expands the size of its workforce.

A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers report anticipated that companies would have to address the implications of their supply chains in regions affected by the coronavirus. For instance, they might have to secure future air transportation as supply and capacity become available, and they might have to buy ahead to procure much-needed inventory and raw materials.

Verusen aims to address this using AI-based technology that automatically integrates with enterprise resource management systems and learns from experts, who can fine-tune the system for automatic inventory naming, categorization, and de-duplication. Verusen says its AI continues to predict and learn from real actions over time. Moreover, it offers suggestions to optimize inventory allocation and procurement that customers can choose to accept or decline.

Verusen

Verusen claims that it helps businesses save an average of $10 million within a three-month period 90-days, including Georgia PacificGraphic Packaging, and AB InBev. “As supply chains start on their digital transformations, we help them better understand their disparate and incomplete data and connect it to trusted business outcomes from the very start,” founder and CEO Paul Noble said in a statement.

To Noble’s point, according to Gartner, by 2023 at least 50% of large global companies will be using AI, advanced analytics, and internet of things technologies in supply chain operations. Meanwhile, McKinsey & Company estimates that companies that “aggressively” digitize their supply chains can expect to boost annual interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) growth by 3.2% and annual revenue growth by 2.3%.

Verusen

“Verusen AI is purpose-built to deliver trusted material records and verify demand signals which influence one another to drive our proprietary trusted network optimization,” Noble continued. “This leads to unparalleled scalable inventory and procurement intelligence helping our customers achieve their material truth.”

BMW i Ventures, Glasswing Ventures, Zetta Venture Partners, Kubera VC, and Engage also participated in Verusen’s funding round announced today. It brings the company’s total raised to date to over $14 million following seed and pre-seed rounds totaling $6.1 million.

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AI

Ukko raises $40 million to address food allergies with AI

Ukko, a 30-employee biotech company using AI to investigate solutions for food allergies and sensitivities, today raised $40 million in series B funding led by Bayer’s Leaps by Bayer. The company says the new funding will allow it to enter clinical trials with an investigational therapeutic for peanut allergies while accelerating development of Ukko’s synthetic gluten designed for people with celiac and other disorders.

Food intolerances and sensitivities are extremely common and appear to be on the rise. In fact, it’s thought that up to 20% of the world’s population may have at least one food intolerance. By one estimate, roughly 6% to 7% of the U.S. population may be gluten-sensitive, for example, meaning that some 20 million people in the U.S. alone could have the condition. That’s perhaps why the global food allergy diagnosis and treatment market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 5.10% to reach 1.83 billion by 2023, according to Market Research Future.

Palo Alto, California-based Ukko, which was cofounded in 2016 by MIT graduate Anat Binur and Yanay Ofran, formerly a Columbia research fellow, aims to apply machine learning technologies in immunology, computational biology, and protein engineering to develop new approaches to treating food sensitivities. The startup is currently building a map of the molecular structure of food allergies and disorders, which it says will enable it to engineer food proteins, eliminating their allergenicity while keeping “good” biochemical and nutritional characteristics intact.

“[Ukko] analyzes millions of antibodies from the blood of people with allergies. Our algorithms use these data to predict what in the peanut protein is triggering the allergic attack by the immune system,” a spokesperson told VentureBeat via email. “Similarly, we analyze millions of immune cells from children with gluten sensitivity to model the exact fragment of the gluten that trigger the attack of the immune system. After we identify the triggers, the elements on the proteins that are recognized by the immune system, we use algorithms to search for ways to minimally alter these elements in a way that will abrogate the binding of the immune system but will otherwise maintain the structure, function and overall traits of the proteins. This is done using algorithms that relate the sequence of the food protein to its structure and function.”

A number of companies are in the process of developing technologies that address food sensitivities. In 2015, AbbVie paid for an option to acquire the rights to a drug that consists of enzymes meant to break down gluten before it can cause a reaction in the small intestine. BioLineRx is testing a polymer that binds to a key part of the gluten protein, preventing it from being absorbed by the body. And Alba Therapeutics has completed midstage trials of a drug — larazotide acetate — that reportedly prevents gluten from squeezing between cell linings and setting off an inflammatory reaction.

For its part, Ukko says it’s working on improved gluten proteins specifically designed for people with celiac and other gluten sensitivities. On the therapeutic side, the company is using its protein design platform to develop an investigational therapy for peanut allergies, with plans to address
additional food allergens down the line.

Ukko claims to have preliminary data that suggests its investigational peanut and gluten proteins don’t trigger immune system allergic reactions. But the company has yet to complete a clinical trial or gain approval for its products from a regulatory agency, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Binur says that Ukko is “committed to working closely” with the FDA and following “all applicable regulations” prior to marketing its food or therapeutics. “We are at the forefront of a revolution. Pharma and the food industry will redefine how they think about their products and missions,” he said in a statement. “Hundreds of millions of people around the world suffer from food allergies and experts see it as a global epidemic. Ending food allergy is critical and is only the beginning. Ukko’s tech has the potential to leverage science and human data to redesign our food and medicine.”

Continental Grain Company, PeakBridge Ventures, Skyviews Life Science, and Fall Line Capital as well as existing investors Khosla Ventures, Innovation Endeavors, and Time Ventures participated in Ukko’s latest funding round. It brings the company’s total raised to date to nearly $50 million.

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Tech News

Bot network on Telegram promises access to data on 500 million Facebook users

Data breaches are nothing new when it comes to various websites and social networks. Recently a cybercriminal forum has begun selling access to what it claims to be a database of phone numbers that belong to Facebook users. The bot network claims to allow customers to look up phone numbers using an automated Telegram bot. The data reportedly appears to be several years old but still represents a cybersecurity and privacy risk for those who own the numbers.

Considering that people rarely change phone numbers, odds are many of the phone numbers are accurate. One of the cybercriminals advertising the bot service says that the database contains information on 500 million users. Facebook has reportedly stated that the data relates to a vulnerability that the company patched in August 2019.

The existence of the botnet was first announced by Alon Gal, co-founder, and CTO of cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock. The bot helps find cellular phone numbers for Facebook users, according to publication Motherboard. It lets users either enter a phone number and receive the corresponding user’s Facebook ID or enter the Facebook ID and receive their phone number.

The hackers offer free access that allows users to look up information, but the information is redacted. Those wanting to get the phone number or Facebook ID can buy a single credit for $20 or 10,000 credits for $5000. The database also allegedly has information on Facebook users from the US, Canada, UK, Australia, and 15 other countries.

The data was leaked back in 2019 after hackers found it was possible to scrape the phone numbers of Facebook users. Facebook claims to have tested the bot itself with newer data, and no results were returned. The social network explained that the contents of the database were created before it fixed the contact vulnerability.

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Categories
AI

Kili Technology unveils data annotation platform to improve AI, raises $7 million

Poor or uncategorized raw data can be a major impediment for enterprises that want to build high-quality artificial intelligence that has a meaningful impact on their business. Organizing unstructured data such as images and audio can present a particularly daunting obstacle in this regard.

Today, Paris-based Kili Technology unveiled its service that allows enterprises to annotate raw data such as video, drone aerial images, contracts, and emails. The company’s collaborative platform enables employees to make the data labeling process more efficient.

The company also said it had raised its first outside funding in a round led by Serena Capital and e.ventures, which invested along with business angels such as Datadog CEO Olivier Pomel, Algolia CEO Nicolas Dessaigne, and PeopleDoc founders Stanislas de Bentzmann and Gus Robertson. After a fast start, the company has ambitious plans to expand its international reach.

“The mission is super simple,” said Kili CEO and cofounder François-Xavier Leduc. “To build AI, you need three things. You need the computing power that you can buy easily on Amazon, you need an algorithm that is available as open source, and you need training sets. We are making the bridge between the raw data and what is required to build AI at scale for companies. Our mission is to help our customers turn this raw data into training data so that they can scale AI applications on their internal challenges to solve their issues.”

The company is part of a fast-moving sector that has seen other startups emerge to tackle data annotation. Dataloop last year raised $16 million for its data annotation tools. SuperAnnotate raised $3 million for its AI techniques that speed up data labeling. And earlier last year, IBM released annotation tools that tap AI to label images.

All of these companies have identified similar issues with developing high-quality AI: Data that can be readily processed to train AI. According to Kili, 29,000 Gigabytes of unstructured data are published every second. But much of it remains useless for training AI.

Founded in 2018 by Leduc and CTO Édouard d’Archimbaud, Kili also offers a stable of experts to complement a company’s internal teams and help accelerate the annotation process.

Kili builds on work d’Archimbaud did while at BNP Paribas, where he ran the bank’s artificial intelligence lab. His team was trying to build models for processing unstructured data, which eventually brought the team around to creating its own tools for data annotation.

Kili’s system, as d’Archimbaud explained, relies on a basic concept, similar to tagging people in a photo on Facebook. Users can click on an image and a little box pops so they can type a name in and attach a label to the image. Kili uses AI to allow enterprises to scale this process to an industrialized scale to create higher-quality datasets.

“Before people were thinking that AI was about algorithms, and having the most state-of-the-art algorithm,” d’Archimbaud said. “But it’s not the case anymore. Today, AI is about having the best data to train models.”

During Kili’s first two years, its cofounders bootstrapped the company. Kili has already attracted large companies as customers in Europe, China, and the U.S. across a variety of industries.

As Kili gained more traction, the confounders decided to raise their first outside round to accelerate sales and marketing. But they also intentionally sought out business angels who worked in other data-related startups to help provide practical guidance on building a global company to seize a growing opportunity.

“Two years ago, the data annotations market was estimated to be $2 billion in four years,” Leduc said. “And now it’s estimated to be $4 billion. It’s going to go fast, and it will definitely be huge. And it’s a new category. So there is an opportunity to be a worldwide leader. Today, we are positioned to be one of them.”

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AI

Wingcopter raises $22 million to ramp up delivery drone production

Wingcopter, a Darmstadt, Germany-based drone manufacturer, today announced that it raised $22 million in a funding round led by Xplorer Capital and Futury Regio Growth Fund. The company says it will use the proceeds to expand its health care-related activities (including the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines), prepare for the launch of its next-gen drones, set up a partially automated production facility, and grow its team at a new U.S. complex.

The commercial drone market was already accelerating, with reports the industry would grow more than fivefold by 2026 from the $1.2 billion it was reportedly worth in 2018. But the pandemic has increased demand for drone services in areas such as medical supply deliveries and site inspections. Honeywell, a major supplier of aerospace systems, launched a new business unit covering drones, air taxis, and unmanned cargo delivery vehicles. And last week, startup American Robotics snagged the first-ever U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to fly automated drones beyond the line of sight.

Wingcopter, which was founded in 2017 by Ansgar Kadura, Jonathan Hesselbarth, and Tom Plümmer, aims to develop drones that improve the lives through commercial and humanitarian applications. The company focuses on the delivery of medical goods, packages, and food as well as inspection, inter-site logistics, and mapping via photogrammetry using aircraft that operates in wind gusts over 45 miles per hour, reaches speeds upwards of 150 miles per hour (in fixed-wing mode), and carries payloads weighing up to 13 pounds.

“In 2015, I came back from a longer stay in Ghana where I had seen the negative consequences of poorly developed healthcare supply chains,” Plümmer told VentureBeat via email. “As I already had some experience with commercial drone services, I fell in love with the idea of using drones for the delivery of urgently needed medical goods to create positive social impact. Not being able to build drones myself, I was looking for an engineer to team up. Shortly after, I was introduced to Hesselbarth, an engineer with a focus on aerospace as well as an outstanding inventor … In 2017, we officially founded Wingcopter as properly registered company together with a third partner, Ansgar Kadura, who helped set up our first medical delivery project in Tanzania and who is now heading our global flight operations.”

Wingcopter

Wingcopter’s electric-powered drones — among them the Wingcopter 178 Heavy Lift — feature a tilt-rotor mechanism that enables them to take off and land vertically, like multicopters. The company claims they can reach a range of up to 75 miles without a payload (or 88 miles with a payload) and an altitude of roughly 3.1 miles while remaining relatively quiet.

In a collaboration with Merck and the Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences, Wingcopter recently performed what it claims was the world’s first beyond-visual-line-of-sight flight between production facilities, flying lab samples 15.5 miles from a Merck plant in Gernsheim to the company’s headquarters in Darmstadt. And last year, Wingcopter announced it would collaborate with UPS subsidiary UPS Flight Forward to design package delivery drones, ultimately toward earning regulatory certification for a Wingcopter aircraft to make commercial delivery flights in the U.S.

As a part of its humanitarian efforts, Wingcopter delivered insulin to an Irish island in the North Sea that’s frequently cut off from the mainland due to inclement weather. On the South Sea island of Vanuatu, the company partnered with the local ministry of health, UNICEF, and health care providers to set up an on-demand vaccines supply, delivering children’s vaccines on-demand from one central hub to 19 remote villages and reducing waiting times from up to 7 hours to a few minutes. In Scotland, Wingcopter launched a drone-based COVID-19 response trial on behalf of the National Health Service Scotland to provide the Isle of Mull with tests, ostensibly cutting delivery times from 6 hours to 15 minutes. And Wingcopter says it’s working with the African Drone and Data Academy to establish a delivery drone network in Malawi, where the company has delivered nearly 200 pounds of medicine to remote areas affected by flooding and started a long-term project — Drone + Data — to improve local health care supply chains.

In the near term, Wingcopter, which has raised $25 million to date and employs over 100 people, says it plans to expand its drone-delivery-as-a-service offerings, which give customers access to its five-continent, fully managed drone delivery network. The company also plans to scale up production at its new 77,500-square-foot headquarters in Weiterstadt, Germany, and hire engineers in the areas in the fields of flight testing, certification, production, software development, ground and flight control software, embedded systems, architecture, and cloud infrastructure.

“We managed to bootstrap and grow the team to over 30 employees just based on revenues, before we decided to accept our first VC investment by Corecam Capital Partners in late 2019 to be able to scale faster,” Plümmer added. “As we are expanding our business model from a pure OEM to OEM-and-drone-as-a-service, we generate more and more recurring revenues for our drone operations services. We have a solid customer base and already sold drones and services … With the fresh funding [and] the new and game-changing Wingcopter generation to be released within the next months, we are now ready to establish partnerships centering around other fully automated delivery applications as well, for example. in groceries, ecommerce, inter-site logistics, or food.”

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Categories
Security

Hackers stole $2.3 million from the Wisconsin Republican party

Hackers reportedly stole $2.3 million from the Wisconsin Republican Party just weeks before the election using a scheme involving manipulated invoices, the Associated Press reports. The group noted the theft on October 22nd; Wisconsin Republican Party Chairman Andrew Hitt says that the FBI is currently investigating the case.

According to Hitt, hackers used faked invoices from several vendors the campaign was working with for things like election mailings and Trump merchandise. Instead of featuring the vendor’s payment information, the documents relayed the money to the hackers.

This kind of hack is actually a fairly common scam: Facebook and Google were hit by a similar phishing scheme in 2017 to the tune of $100 million. Scammers regularly use fake invoices to target businesses, organizations, and other groups, hoping to sneak in bogus receipts alongside the legitimate ones. Given how frantic managing an election campaign in the final weeks before the election can be, it’s easy to imagine how the scammed invoices might have slipped by.

The AP report doesn’t note how long the hackers were siphoning money off of the account, but the sum is a sizable one, given that Wisconsin Republican spokesman Alec Zimmerman notes that the party’s federal account currently contains $1.1 million (at time of press — that amount will likely change given the fast pace of the election).

Wisconsin is viewed as an essential state for both the Trump and Biden campaigns in the upcoming election.

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Categories
AI

AlphaICs raises $8 million for AI-at-the-edge processors

AlphaICs has raised $8 million in funding for artificial intelligence processors for edge computing.

The round was led by Emerald Technology Ventures and Endiya Partners.

The Milpitas, California-based company was started in 2016 by Vinod Dham, a former Intel executive known as the “father of the Pentium.” He teamed up with younger chip designers to develop Real AI processors for edge applications, those at the edge of the network. Dham is now a board member, and the company is run by CEO Pradeep Vajram.

The team is creating a coprocessor chip that can do agent-based artificial intelligence. These RAP chips could one day be deployed in computing devices and autonomous cars to make decisions at lightning speeds, or in datacenters on a massive scale.

Above: Edge computing is getting more popular.

Image Credit: AlphaICs

The company will use the funds to finish designing its Gluon AI chip, develop the software stack, and build system solutions for its target markets.

The round included existing investors ReBright Partners and 3One4 Capital, along with Aaruha Technology Fund, Ireon Ventures, Canal Ventures, JSR Corporation, CBC Co., and Whiteboard Capital.

Emerald investment director Michal Natora will join AlphaICs’ board of directors.

With the growth in popularity of deep neural networks, there has been a huge demand for running such networks on edge devices in real time. Market researcher Omdia forecasts that global AI edge chipset revenue will grow from $7.7 billion in 2019 to $51.9 billion by 2025 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 37.5%.

AlphaICs’ Real AI Processor

Above: Real AI Processors can handle edge tasks such as identifying objects on the road.

Image Credit: AlphaICs

AlphaICs’ chips are based on a proprietary highly modular and scalable architecture, enabling AI acceleration for low-power edge applications, as well as high-performance edge datacenters. The chips do a lot of processing on-chip, rather than reaching out remotely for processing in datacenters.

AlphaICs’ architecture provides inference performance and is equally suited for edge learning. The rapidly developing field of edge learning promotes privacy, enables automated labeling, and facilitates continuous learning of new scenarios.

The applications include markets such as high-end smartphones, wearables, and enterprise markets like robots, cameras, and sensors. Varjam said the company is working with strategic partners to bring products out in the industrial, automotive, and surveillance markets. The company has 19 employees.

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AI

Swapp raises $7 million to automate construction planning with AI

Swapp, a company that leverages AI for construction planning, today announced that it raised $7 million in venture capital. The company plans to put the funds toward “continued market expansion” and growing its platform’s AI capabilities.

The construction industry and its broader ecosystem erects buildings, infrastructure, and industrial structures that form the foundation of whole economies. Private-equity firms raised more than $388 billion to fund infrastructure projects, including $100 billion in 2019 alone, a 24% increase from 2018. But construction, including various conception, architectural design, and engineering processes, requires consulting with experts including architects, engineers, and land surveyors.

Swapp, which former Autodesk Israel CEO Eitan Tsarfati cofounded in 2019, claims its AI-powered platform eliminates the need to work with outside experts by streamlining the construction planning phase. After uploading site, floor drawings, and requirements for the exterior or interior of a project, Swapp customers receive a selection of algorithmically generated planning options to maximize building efficiency and minimize construction costs.

Swapp’s product automates tasks like initial mass planning and analyzing architectural typologies, and it integrates with third-party geographic information platforms and different data sources from locations across the globe. All data relevant to a project is visualized in a dashboard that users can view on the web.

“Swapp’s AI solution is a game-changer in the field of real estate development and construction-planning,” Tsarfati said in a statement. “For the first time in the history of construction, real estate developers and construction companies can use a single platform to build their entire construction planning project and begin work within weeks instead of 9-12 months. We are already working … to replace the slow, tedious, and inflexible construction planning process with our smart, efficient, and flexible, planning solution. This investment will help us grow our customer base and expand our AI capabilities to advance the future of construction planning.”

Point72 Ventures and Entrée Capital led the seed round in Swapp, which has offices in Tel Aviv as well as London. “We believe Swapp has the ability to reinvent architecture by automating the entire construction planning process,” Daniel Gwak, partner at Point72 Ventures, said. “Swapp’s AI-powered platform is designed to help modernize real estate development by simplifying the slow and fragmented planning process, allowing developers to create a full set of architectural plans within weeks. We are pleased to support their continued growth.”

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