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Respawn pulls Titanfall from sale with vague promises for the future

Respawn Entertainment today announced that it has delisted Titanfall, effectively removing it from sale. Titanfall was the first game Respawn Entertainment made as a new studio back in 2014, and now it seems the title is being retired. It isn’t all bad news, though, as those who own the game will still be able to play it even after it disappears from storefronts.

Respawn/Electronic Arts

Respawn pulls the game that started it all

Respawn announced its decision to pull Titanfall in a statement published to Twitter today. “We’ve made the decision to discontinue new sales of the original Titanfall game starting today and we’ll be removing the game from subscription services on March 1, 2022,” Respawn said. “We will, however, be keeping servers live for the dedicated fanbase still playing and those who own the game and are looking to drop into a match.”

Even though Titanfall has disappeared from storefronts and will vanish from streaming services next year, the servers are going to stay live so those who already own the title can continue playing it. While we’re sure most people who wanted to play Titanfall have already purchased the game, those who missed the chance to buy the digital version always have used disc copies they can pick up.

It’s a little bit strange to see Respawn pull Titanfall from storefronts while keeping the servers up and running. Still, if the game has a decent number of players routinely dropping into multiplayer, Respawn probably didn’t want to risk losing consumer goodwill by turning the servers off.

What’s next for the Titanfall series?

After announcing that Titanfall will be delisted, Respawn went on to assure fans that the game won’t be forgotten. “Rest assured, Titanfall is core to Respawn’s DNA and this incredible universe will continue,” the studio said. “Today in Titanfall 2 and Apex Legends, and in the future.”

That part is particularly interesting because it suggests there’s more Titanfall to come. Though the original Titanfall and its sequel have garnered a sizable fanbase, these days, Respawn’s attention is on Apex Legends – a free-to-play battle royale title set in the Titanfall universe that is fairly distinct from a gameplay perspective.

The success of Apex Legends (and the rise of the battle royale genre as an alternative to traditional FPS games) has prompted some Titanfall fans to assume the series is largely over and that we won’t see another Titanfall game in the future. Respawn’s statement today possibly suggests otherwise, though it’s too vague to say for sure.

Still, it’s always possible that Respawn is removing Titanfall from sale because it has something new with the franchise in the works. Until we get confirmation of any such plans, it’s probably safe to assume the company is simply removing the game to focus on Apex Legends. We’ll let you know if Respawn announces anything major in the future, so stay tuned for more.



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Rockstar pulls the remastered GTA trilogy on PC

The PC version of Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy — The Definitive Edition seems to have some serious issues at the minute. The bundle — a remastered collection of GTA III, GTA: Vice City and GTA: San Andreas — arrived on Thursday. However, at the time of writing, the Rockstar Games website says “this title is currently unavailable in your country or region.” Console players can still buy it on the Xbox, PlayStation and Switch digital stores.

A screenshot of the Rockstar Games website indicating that Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy — The Definitive Edition is

Rockstar Games

According to Kotaku, those who bought the title on PC before it disappeared are unable to play it at the minute. Rockstar removed the older versions of the three games from PC storefronts before the collection arrived.

Adding to the publisher’s woes, the Rockstar Launcher has been out of commission for around 24 hours “for maintenance” — not a great look when Rockstar just released a new collection of some of its most notable games. That means Rockstar’s PC games like Grand Theft Auto Online and Red Dead Online are unavailable. The store, cloud services, downloads and authentication systems are also down.

“We thank you for your patience and understanding as we continue to work on restoring services for the Rockstar Games Launcher and supported titles,” Rockstar wrote on Twitter early Friday morning. Engadget has contacted Rockstar Games for comment.

Some fans have expressed disappointment at the quality of remasters, with screenshots of glitches and videos of bugs popping up. One player posted a video of a rainstorm in San Andreas that made it difficult to see anything around CJ. 

Update 11/12/21 10PM ET: Rockstar told Engadget in a statement:

“The Rockstar Games Launcher is now back online. However, Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – The Definitive Edition will remain unavailable to play or purchase as we work to remove some data files that were unintentionally included in the new versions of these games. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience and we hope to have the correct versions of the games up and running for everyone as soon as possible.”

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Konami pulls some Metal Gear Solid games from digital stores

Konami is removing a couple of titles from digital storefronts and platforms for the time being due to licensing issues. Unless you can find a physical copies of them, Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty and Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater are no longer available to buy. The publisher said it’s “working on renewing the licenses for select historical archive footage used in-game.” Along with the individual games, Konami is pulling bundles that include either game.

The move affects titles on , PlayStation Now, Xbox 360, Nintendo 3DS, and NVIDIA Shield (not exactly the most current of platforms in most cases). It’s not clear when MGS2 and MGS3 will return to stores, or whether Konami will keep the footage in question.

It’s hardly the first time licensing issues have affected games long after they were released. from storefronts after Remedy’s rights to certain songs on the soundtrack expired. Rockstar Games, meanwhile, has from various Grand Theft Auto titles over the years for the same reason.

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