Categories
Computing

LG’s new OLED gaming monitor packs a 240Hz refresh rate

LG could have two of the best new monitors on its hands. Its UltraGear OLED gaming monitor and UltraFine Display Ergo AI are coming soon, and the brand will showcase at IFA 2022 in Berlin, Germany in early September.

Both curved displays introduce new technologies to LG’s consumer lines and provide unique experiences for users. The UltraGear OLED gaming monitor, model 45GR95QE, is the brand’s first OLED display featuring a 240Hz refresh rate. Meanwhile, the LG UltraFine Display Ergo AI, model 32UQ890, is able to adjust its position throughout the day with AI tracking to provide users with maximum ergonomic comfort.

LG touts the UltraGear OLED gaming monitor as ideal for immersive gaming. In addition to a 240Hz refresh rate, it is also the first 45-inch display to have an 800R curvature. Some spec highlights include a WQHD (3440 x 1440) resolution for the OLED monitor, a 21:9 aspect ratio, 0.1 milliseconds gray-to-gray response time, 98.5% DCI-P3 color coverage, HDR10, and a Variable Refresh Rate (VRR).

The UltraGear OLED gaming monitor also features a borderless design and an anti-glare and low reflection coating to maintain viewing quality. For ports, the monitor includes HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 1.4. It also supports picture-by-picture and picture-in-picture for productivity.

The UltraFine Display Ergo AI is aimed as a home or office peripheral with a built-in AI camera that can analyze a user’s posture by tracking their eyes and adjusting the tilt and height of the display accordingly. The tilt has a range of 40 degrees, while the height can be adjusted by 160 millimeters. The consistent display movement helps users not remain in one position for long periods of time and to prevent bad posture habits. Users can set the monitor to one of three modes for their ergonomic preference: AI Motion, Continuous Motion, or Periodic Motion.

Specifications for the monitor include a 31.5-inch 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution, an IPS panel, 95% coverage of DCI-P3, and HDR.

The UltraFine Display Ergo AI is essentially a higher-tech version of the LG DualUp monitor, which was released in June. That monitor feature’s LG’s second-generation Ergo stand, with manual pivot, height, tilt, and swivel movements, which allows the display to maximize ergonomic comfort for users.

Price and availability details for the UltraGear OLED gaming monitor and the UltraFine Display Ergo AI will likely be announced during or after IFA, which takes place from September 2 to 6.

By the time the UltraGear OLED gaming monitor launches, its closest competitor will likely be the 32-inch 240Hz Samsung Odyssey Neo G8, which has been available on the market since June, selling for $1,500.

Editors’ Choice




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Categories
Computing

F1 2022 performance guide: Best settings for high frame rate

F1 2022 is here, and like every annual release from the popular racing series, it’s a huge benchmark for PC performance. It’s demanding but well optimized. I booted up the DT test bench to find the best settings for F1 2022 so you can have a high frame rate.

You don’t need to do a lot of work to get F1 2022 working, especially with its multiple upscaling options. Ray tracing is a performance killer, though, and it’s not worth the frame rate dip for the vast majority of players.

The best settings for F1 2022

F1 2022 has a ton of graphics options, and none of them destroy performance or image quality. Ray tracing, which I’ll dig into later, is the main culprit of performance issues. Otherwise, you can stick with one of the game’s five presets to get an image you like, as well as use the dynamic resolution option in the Display settings menu to improve your frame rate. If you want to go at it on your own, here are the best settings for F1 2022:

  • Lighting quality: Medium
  • Post process: High
  • Shadows: Medium
  • Particles: Low
  • Crowd: Medium
  • Mirrors: High
  • Car and helmet reflections: High
  • Weather effects: High
  • Ground cover: Medium
  • Skidmarks: High
  • Skidmarks blending: On
  • Ambient occlusion: HBAO+
  • Screen space reflections: Medium
  • Asynchronous compute: On
  • Texture streaming: High

I mainly optimized the settings with the best practices for PC game graphics. That means bumping down the shadows and lighting quality first, which both have the biggest impact on performance. I kept some of the smaller settings, like skidmarks and weather effects, turned up because of their limited performance hit. Feel free to bump down these settings if you’re running into issues, though.

Most people should stick around medium to high settings. I’ll go more in-depth in the benchmarks below, but F1 2022 shows diminishing returns beyond Medium for most settings. The Ultra Low preset isn’t too useful for the best graphics cards, offering only a slight bump over the Medium preset. With multiple upscaling options available, the only reason to go down to Ultra Low is if you’re running well below the recommended system requirements.

F1 2022 system requirements

System requirements for F1 2022.

F1 2022 doesn’t call for much, but the system requirements are a little misleading. At a minimum, an ancient Core i3-2130 or AMD FX 4300 is all you need, but I’d recommend sticking with the recommended specs when it comes to the CPU. F1 2022 is really CPU limited, so pairing a fast GPU with an older processor is sure to cause a PC bottleneck.

For graphics, even a GTX 1050 Ti should be enough at 1080p (though one of the best 1080p graphics cards is better). F1 2022 is really well optimized with ray tracing turned off, and you have a lot of bandwidth to improve your performance with dynamic resolution and the supersampling options in the game.

Ray tracing is the killer. You’ll need a GPU with DirectX 12 support to run the game, even if you want to turn ray tracing off. With ray tracing on, you’ll also need a much faster GPU. The system requirements only call for an RTX 2060 or RX 6700 XT, but I wouldn’t recommend ray tracing with anything less than an RTX 3070. Otherwise, you’ll likely have to settle for frame rates below 60 fps, especially if you want to run at a high resolution.

F1 2022 benchmarks (4K, 1440p, 1080p)

4K benchmarks for F1 2022.

There are five graphics presets in F1 2022, and I tested all of them across 4K, 1440p, and 1080p with a Ryzen 9 5950X, RTX 3070, and 32GB of DDR4-3200 memory. Across resolutions, one preset is vastly slower than the others: Ultra High. This is the only preset that turns on ray tracing as a default option, and it’s extremely demanding.

At 4K, for example, you can see that the RTX 3070 just barely manages 30 fps with the Ultra High preset. The next step down results in a massive 238% increase in performance mostly on the back of turning ray tracing off. Medium offers a solid 32% bump over that, as well.

As mentioned, F1 2022 is fairly CPU limited, so performance returns start to fall off beyond the Medium preset. 1440p and 1080p illustrate this point clearly. They’re much closer in performance at each preset, and in some cases, such as the Medium preset, 1440p and 1080p show nearly identical performance. Take advantage of the lower settings if you have an older processor, but don’t count on them to improve your graphics performance.

Ray tracing in F1 2022

It should be clear by now, but ray tracing is extremely demanding in F1 2022. The most demanding Ultra High ray tracing preset can cause as much as a 63% slowdown in your average frame rate, so keep ray tracing turned off unless you have a super power graphics card like the RTX 3090 Ti, or if you take advantage of upscaling options.

Before getting to ray tracing performance, we need to talk about how it works in F1 2022. The game supports ray-traced shadows, reflections, transparent reflections, and ambient occlusion. You have a toggle for each of these settings, as well as three overall quality presets for ray tracing: Medium, High, and Ultra High. You can’t set the quality for individual settings, but the quality doesn’t have a huge impact on performance regardless.

Ray tracing benchmarks for F1 2022.

You can see that in the graph above. The High and Ultra High ray tracing presets have almost identical performance (the game actually uses the High settings for the Ultra High graphics preset). The Medium setting offers a solid 75% increase over the High preset, but it’s still far below just turning ray tracing off.

I’m struggling to see a difference between the quality modes for ray tracing, so if you turn it on, I’d recommend sticking with Medium quality. Most people should just turn ray tracing off, though, as the screen space reflections offer plenty of visual glitter without the massive hit to your frame rate.

DLSS and FSR in F1 2022

Ray tracing is demanding, but F1 2022 gives you options to combat the performance deficit. The game supports Nvidia’s Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) and AMD’s FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR). They both give you a way to improve performance by lowering the resolution the game renders at. F1 2022 includes its own dynamic resolution setting, too, though it doesn’t look nearly as nice as DLSS or FSR.

DLSS benchmarks for F1 2022.

DLSS doesn’t offer the highest performance, but it’s the best option to maintain image quality. At 4K with the Ultra High preset, it offered a 50% boost in performance with the Quality mode. That’s big, but I’d recommend most people stick with the Balanced mode when using DLSS. It more than doubled my average frame rate without sacrificing image quality too much.

FSR benchmarks for F1 2022.

Unfortunately, DLSS only works on Nvidia’s RTX graphics cards. For everyone else, there’s FSR. F1 2022 only supports FSR 1.0, not the much better FSR 2.0 we’ve seen in games like DeathloopI wouldn’t go beyond the Balanced preset for FSR 1.0 if you want decent image quality, though. FSR falls apart beyond that point.

An interesting trend with both DLSS and FSR is that they fall off past the Balanced mode. With F1 2022 being CPU limited the way it is, the more aggressive quality modes don’t offer as much of a bump in performance as they should.

Editors’ Choice




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Categories
Game

Epic Games Store will randomly ask users to rate games to prevent review bombing

has added a long-awaited feature to its store: user ratings. The company that only those who have played a game for at least two hours will be able to rate it on a five-star scale. Not everyone will be able to rate a game either. Epic will randomly offer players the chance to score a game after they finish a play session. The company believes this approach will prevent and make sure ratings are from people who are actually playing the games.

An overall rating will be calculated based on players’ scores and this will appear on a title’s page. The aim, of course, is to help users figure out whether a game’s worth playing. Store pages already featured critics’ reviews to help folks make a decision about whether to buy or download something.

Epic says it likely won’t ask for ratings on every game or app and the randomization approach will help it avoid spamming players. That seems like a good call. It’s a little annoying, for instance, that Microsoft asks for feedback after every Xbox Cloud Gaming session.

Polls on Epic Games Store

Epic Games

In addition, Epic may ask you to answer a poll after a game session. There’s a broad range of questions, including the likes of whether a game is better to play with a team or how challenging the combat is. 

Epic will use data from polls to create tags for store pages. Eventually, tags will be used on category pages and to create tag-based categories for the home page. The idea is to improve discoverability and help people gain a better understanding of what to expect from a game. 

Separately, Epic is a set of cross-play tools for developers. Epic Online Services an overlay that can merge Steam and Epic Games friends lists and help players find their buds, send friend requests and hop into multiplayer sessions with cross-platform in-game invites.

Epic has broader ambitions for support beyond Steam. It’s working to support other PC launchers, as well as macOS and Linux. It will add cross-play tools for consoles and mobile to the SDK further down the line. Several of Epic’s own games — including Fortnite, Rocket League and Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout — have full cross-play support.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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Categories
Security

Interpol Warns of High Rate of Cyberattacks During Pandemic

Interpol has warned that the coronavirus pandemic has led to an “alarming” rate of cyberattacks as criminals focus increasingly on larger organizations by targeting staff working from home.

A report released by the international police agency on Thursday, August 4, said that since the start of the pandemic it has seen a “significant target shift from individuals and small businesses to major corporations, governments, and critical infrastructure.”

It said that while the spread of the coronavirus has led to more organizations and businesses setting up remote networks to enable their staff to work from home, online security measures are often not as robust as those in the workplace, making it easier for cybercriminals to cause disruption, steal data, and generate profits.

“Cybercriminals are developing and boosting their attacks at an alarming rate, exploiting the fear and uncertainty caused by the unstable social and economic situation created by COVID-19,” said Jurgen Stock, secretary-general of Interpol.

The organization says it has seen an uptick in many different types of attacks, including phishing, where a perpetrator sends someone a fake email in a bid to trick the victim into clicking on a malicious link — a scam that could lead to the target giving up sensitive information about their business.

Cybercriminals are also launching more attacks using ransomware, a method that locks a computer system until a sum of money is paid.

With the pandemic still the main focus of so many people’s lives, perpetrators are also changing their tactics by increasingly impersonating government and healthcare facilities in emails that attempt to trick their targets into clicking on a link that could ultimately lead to a malware or ransomware attack.

Interpol, which counts the U.S. among its 194 member states, has also warned that if a vaccine is developed, cybercriminals will likely try to use it to launch more attacks by referring to it in bogus emails.

Twitter recently suffered a major hack where some of its employees, who may have been working from home, were tricked into giving up vital information about its internal systems. Meanwhile, tech company Garmin experienced a ransomware attack last month that forced a server outage, causing major disruption to customers using Garmin Connect, the network that controls data syncs for its wearables and online apps. The Kansas-based company has reportedly since received a decryption key to recover its files, suggesting it may have paid a ransom that one report put at $10 million.

Interpol urged organizations and businesses to ensure they have effective online security measures in place or risk becoming the next victim as cybercriminals increase their activities during the pandemic.

Editors’ Choice




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Categories
Tech News

How to check any app’s refresh rate on Android

Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff.

More and more Android phones are adopting displays with higher refresh rates than the standard 60Hz. And it’s not just the flagships; Xiaomi just launched a $270 Redmi Note 10 Pro with a superb AMOLED display that supports 120Hz.

A higher refresh rate allows for smoother animations, whether you’re scrolling web pages or playing graphics-intensive gamesHowever, not all apps support high refresh rates. So how can you check if they do? I’ve got your back.

First, we need to enable developer mode on your Android phone. Here’s how to do that:

  • Head to Settings and locate the About phone section.
  • Tap on the software version five times.
  • Note that every time you’ll tap, you should see a popup that reads, “You are X steps away from being a developer.”
  • You’ll finally get a “You’re now a developer” popup.