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Latest Humble Bundle includes most of the Resident Evil back catalog

Now is a good moment to catch up on the Resident Evil series ahead of next year’s RE4 remake. Humble is offering a “Decades of Horror” bundle that includes most Resident Evil games for PC. Spend enough to get the full 11-game collection and you’ll play remastered and remade versions of the first three titles, the existing versions of RE4 through RE7, and side games like the Revelations series and RE0. You’ll also receive a 50 percent off coupon for Resident Evil Village if you want to start on it before its first DLC arrives.

You can pay as little as $1 for a three-item pack that includes the original Resident Evil, Revelations and the first episode of Revelations 2. An in-between six-game bundle includes RE1, RE0, RE5, RE6, Revelations and Revelations 2 Deluxe Edition. As usual, you can pay extra to contribute more of your purchase to charity.

The bundle comes on the heels of Netflix’s live-action TV series. There are clearly some gaps dictated largely by platform support — you won’t find Code Veronica, alas. All the same, this could easily be worth the investment if you’re new to Capcom’s survival horror series or just want to fill out your collection.

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Resident Evil Village Winters’ Expansion arrives on October 28th

The downloadable content Capcom had promised for Resident Evil Village last year now has a release date: It’s called Winters’ Expansion, and it will be available starting on October 28th. Capcom started developing the extra content in 2021, just a few weeks after the game was released, due “popular demand.” Now Capcom producer Tsuyoshi Kanda has revealed some pertinent details about the three features included with the DLC, including the Third-Person Mode that gives you a way to play the main story in a new perspective. If you choose to play in third-person, you’ll get to see Ethan as he explores the village in search of his missing daughter and shoots the undead.

Winters’ Expansion also comes with The Mercenaries Additional Orders. Mercenaries Mode, an arcade-style shooting experience, unlocks after you beat the game for the first time. The DLC will add new stages to it, as well as new playable characters, including Chris Redfield and everyone’s favorite nine-foot tall antagonist, Lady Dimitrescu. Finally, the expansion will show what happens to Rose, Ethan’s missing daughter, 16 years after the original campaign. Rose’s story will show her struggle with her “terrifying powers” and her search for a way to break free from her curse. 

Aside from the DLC, Resident Evil Re:Verse — the multiplayer freebie for the game that was supposed to come out in July 2021 — will also be available on October 28th. The PS5 versions of Resident Evil 7, Resident Evil 2 and Resident Evil 3 have already dropped, though, and you can get them for free if you already own copies for the PS4.

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Capcom is using Stadia tech for a web-based ‘Resident Evil Village’ demo

Starting today, you can stream a free demo of Resident Evil Village from Capcom’s website, with no need for a fancy gaming PC, Xbox or PlayStation. The demo is similar to one that’s available on other platforms, which allows players to explore parts of the village and castle. This appetizer for one of last year’s biggest-selling games is powered by Immersive Stream for Games, a version of Stadia tech that Google is licensing to others.

The demo will work on just about any computer, as well as iOS and Android phones and tablets, as long as the device can handle high-definition video and you have a sturdy enough internet connection (with a download speed of at least 10Mbps). It runs on Chrome on Windows, macOS and Android. On iOS, you can try it on Safari. The resolution tops out at 1080p and there’s no HDR mode.

PlayStation DualShock 4 and Xbox One controllers are officially supported, but other peripherals might work. Alternatively, you can use touch controls on mobile or a mouse and keyboard. 

Resident Evil Village touch controls

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As with Stadia’s click-to-play trials, there’s no need to register to play the demo. It’s worth noting that you’ll be disconnected after 10 minutes of inactivity. There’s no save function, so you’ll need to restart from the beginning if you disconnect. You can play as many times as you like and there’s no time limit, unlike previous versions of the demo.

You can play the demo on Capcom’s website if you are in the US, UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Belgium, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania or Hungary.

Capcom is Google’s second partner for Immersive Stream for Games. AT&T started offering its wireless customers free access to Batman: Arkham Asylum last October and Control: Ultimate Edition last month. Capcom seems more of a natural bedfellow, though.

Back in February, Insider reported that Google was looking to secure deals with Capcom, Peloton and others to build the licensing aspect of its game-streaming business. It was suggested that Capcom might use the tech to stream demos from its website, which turned out to be the case. This could even be a precursor to Capcom running its own game streaming storefront.

In other Resident Evil Village news, Capcom is bringing the game to Mac later this year. It’s also working on a version for the upcoming PlayStation VR2 headset.

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Capcom’s ‘Resident Evil 4’ remake lands on March 24th, 2023

Capcom’s oft-rumored, much-anticipated remake of Resident Evil 4 is officially a thing and it’s heading to PS5, Xbox Series X and S, and PC via Steam on March 24th, 2023. The studio debuted a trailer for the project during the PlayStation State of Play live stream.

The game will be a revamp of the original, beloved 2005 title starring Leon S. Kennedy and the president’s daughter, Ashley Graham. And, of course, a bunch of homicidal infected villagers.

“We aim to make the game feel familiar to fans of the series, while also providing a fresh feeling to it,” a Capcom producer said on the PlayStation Blog. “This is being done by reimagining the storyline of the game while keeping the essence of its direction, modernizing the graphics and updating the controls to a modern standard.”

Capcom also teased some Resident Evil 4 content built specifically for PlayStation VR 2, the incoming version of Sony’s console VR headset. 

On top of all the old-school remake goodness, Capcom is also building a PSVR2 version of Resident Evil: Village, the latest Resident Evil game. The first trailer for this bit of content features scenes from early sections of the game, focusing on everyone’s favorite tall vampire lady.

The PSVR2 edition of Resident Evil: Village will feature the entire PS5 version of the game. Capcom and Sony partnered up to bring Resident Evil 7 to VR back in 2017, and this formula seems to be working for them.

There’s no release date for Sony’s PSVR2 quite yet, and no word on a release date for that Resident Evil: Village DLC we were promised a year ago.

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How Resident Evil’s tallest and most terrifying vampire lady, Alcina Dimitrescu, came to life

Countess Alcina Dimitrescu isn’t technically a vampire, but she’s definitely an icon.

From the moment she appeared in an early trailer for Resident Evil: Village, Lady Dimitrescu captured the attention of the internet: her towering, sultry frame; her sickly-sweet smile; her massive hat; her proper yet authoritative tone. Viewers were instantly obsessed, labeling her “tall vampire lady” and demanding to know everything about her, which prompted Capcom to reveal her exact height — 9’6″ including her hat and heels — months before Village launched in May.

In-game, Lady Dimitrescu commands three fly-infested, murderous daughters, and hunts the main character, Ethan Winters, across the opulent rooms of her castle. She crouches through doorways and slices at Ethan with long, blade-like fingernails, hurling insults like “rat” and “man-thing” at him the entire time, a mutant dominatrix in a flowing white dress.

Lady Dimitrescu

Twilight Sparkle

The intrigue surrounding Lady Dimitrescu has persisted since Village‘s launch, and fans are betting (or maybe just hoping really hard) that the game’s first bit of DLC will focus on her specifically.

Until then, and in the spirit of Spooky Season, we have insight into Lady Dimitrescu’s creation from Village presentation director Masato Miyazaki, the person in charge of the game’s motion-capture process. Earlier this year, Miyazaki shared details with Engadget about how Lady Dimitrescu came to be, from concept to mocap, including the ways actress Maggie Robertson brought her to legendary life.

Engadget: Did Lady Dimitrescu’s design change throughout development?

Masato Miyazaki: Alcina Dimitrescu’s incredible height was conceived from the beginning and was not changed during development. The same goes for her wide brim hat and her white dress as well. However, the characteristic of her long protruding nails was something added part way through the development process. It was an idea that was implemented later as a means of adding physical elements that would make her more terrifying when you encounter her.

Lady Dimitrescu is alluring and seductive was she always meant to be a sultry character, or did that emerge during mocap?

In the early stages of development, she was described as a bewitching character who would capture and toy with her victims. She was designed to embody equal parts beauty and horror. Based on this, the scenario writer fleshed her characterization out even further with dialogue, but she wasn’t fully realized just yet. It was through Maggie’s performance that the character was finally given life.

As with any character, I believe that the moment the script is handed over to the actor, the character becomes theirs. The character’s personality and intentions are very much refined by the actor. The character Lady Dimitrescu was truly realized and came to fruition with each of Maggie’s performances.

Lady Dimitrescu (Maggie Robertson) in Resident Evil Village

Capcom

What tricks did you use to make Maggie Robertson as tall as possible during mocap sessions?

Although Maggie Robertson is quite tall herself, she still cannot reach the height that we envisioned for Lady Dimitrescu. Utilizing some means of extending out her height would jeopardize her performance, so it wasn’t something we could consider. We asked Maggie to act naturally. However, that still left us with the height difference between Maggie and Lady Dimitrescu that had to be addressed. We devised a few methods to counteract this issue.

First off, we shot with a mixture of backgrounds according to two standards: human scale and Lady Dimitrescu scale. While other characters performed with surroundings that fit human scale, Lady Dimitrescu’s acting was done in front of a background that fit her scale. Everyone performed with one another, but with this mixture of environments. We figured this would be the best means of allowing the actors to give their best performances without any kind of impediment. We made sure the furniture was laid out in a way so that the actors would be facing each other.

The other aspect that we made sure to stay conscious of was making sure the actors’ lines of sight were in the right positions. We set up markers so that the actors could imagine the correct height. These markers show the correct position of the eye lines and where the limbs actually are. It’s a simple adjustment, but it makes a big difference in the actors’ performances.

The third adjustment was the rig itself. We carefully set up the rigs of the CG characters to gracefully handle as much of the physical differences between the character and actor as possible. We wanted to make sure that we set things up so that the animators would have a relatively easier time handling any kind of miscalculations that happened along the way.

What was the strangest prop you used throughout the mocap process?

There are several, but there are two that I would like to mention. The first is the cane carried by the old woman we meet at the beginning of the village. When you see it in the game, it’s a strange artifact with a lot of components jingling about. The studio crew crafted a prop that resembles the design.

The second is the goggles that our actor Todd wore as he played the role of Ethan Winters. Since the game is from a first-person perspective through the eyes of Ethan Winters, the camera movements are based on the movements of Todd’s head. Todd reprises his role as Ethan from the previous game and his performances are absolutely excellent, but there were moments where the camera would go wild during more heated scenarios. In order to suppress this from happening, the studio engineer created a pair of special goggles by hand. 

They actually turned out to look very similar to swimming goggles. The assumption was that the narrower field of vision would result in less head movement. I’m still not entirely sure how effective they ended up being, but the engineer’s enthusiasm and Todd having fun wearing the goggles are one of the many wonderful memories I have from the whole experience.

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Resident Evil’s Chris Redfield and Jill Valentine come to ‘Fortnite’

Epic Games’ fondness for Capcom continues unabated. The game developer has added legendary Resident Evil characters Chris Redfield and Jill Valentine (aka the “master of unlocking“) to Fortnite, complete with numerous nods to the zombie-slaying franchise. Chris and Jill have alternate costumes that make nods to their appearances in Village and Nemesis, while the Back Bling offers three shades of Resident Evil’s life-sustaining herbs. There are themed pickaxes and even a “brolly stroll” emote making fun of everyone’s least-favorite fictional corporation.

The outfits and equipment are available to buy in separate S.T.A.R.S. Team and S.T.A.R.S. Team Gear bundles. The Resident Evil packs are particularly timely drops given Halloween and the hordes of “Cube Monsters” in the current season, and we won’t be surprised if they lose some of their early luster. Still, this is a Fortnite gaming crossover that makes sense — Chris and Jill are already well-dressed for a bitter fight for survival.

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‘Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City’ trailer is full of zombies

Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City, a reboot of the movie series, will hit theaters on November 24th, and Sony Pictures has provided a taste of what’s in store with the first trailer. Writer and director Johannes Roberts (47 Meters Down) indicated earlier this year that he was taking things back to the franchise’s horror roots and the trailer offers some positive signs that he’s achieved his goal.

The film is based on the first two games in the classic series and it’s a complete reset following the six (6) Paul W.S. Anderson movies. In case there was any ambiguity about Roberts starting over, the trailer’s opening voiceover puts that firmly to bed. “Every story has a beginning,” one character, perhaps Claire Redfield, says. “Discover the origin of evil.”

Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City is set in 1998, and we see the first game’s creepy mansion as well as some of the city where the sequel takes place. The trailer hits a lot of the right beats and it includes some memorable moments from the games. There’s a nod to the opening scene of Resident Evil 2, in which an infected truck driver plows his tanker into Raccoon City. Despite a couple of iffy CGI shots, there’s some solid creature design too, including zombie dogs and even a licker. Add in some jump scares, and it’s a promising first look.

If you’re craving more Resident Evil until the movie arrives, you can check out a virtual-reality version of Resident Evil 4 on Oculus Quest 2 later this month. Elsewhere, a live-action show based on the franchise is coming to Netflix. The delayed multiplayer game Resident Evil Re:Verse will arrive next year, and Capcom is working on DLC for Resident Evil Village.

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Resident Evil Re:Verse hit with a big delay at the last minute

Capcom has revealed that Resident Evil Re:Verse, a multiplayer game mode originally intended to ship with Resident Evil Village, has been delayed once more. That is probably obvious to those who have been following Re:Verse, as it was slated to release sometime this month. However, considering that we’re now halfway through July and there’s been no word on a specific release date, the writing was probably on the wall for Resident Evil fans.

Indeed, today Capcom announced that Resident Evil Re:Verse has been delayed once more, and this time it’s a big one. Capcom has pushed the multiplayer game back to 2022, leaving it at that and not getting any more specific. That is a hefty delay, and with no indication of when in 2022 Re:Verse might arrive, it’s possible it could be a year or more before we see it launch.

“The previously announced July 2021 launch of Resident Evil Re:Verse is being moved to 2022 so that the team can continue working to deliver a smooth gameplay experience,” Capcom said on Twitter today. “We will share updated launch details at a later time. Thank you for your patience and understanding.”

In a follow-up tweet, Capcom said that those who purchased a physical copy of Resident Evil Village should either keep track of their Re:Verse download code or redeem it now. Redeeming it now is probably the wiser move since that will add it to your account and allow you to download Re:Verse whenever it becomes available.

So, if you were looking forward to Resident Evil Re:Verse, the wait just became significantly longer. With its new 2022 release window, we probably won’t be hearing about this game for some time to come, but we’ll let you know when Capcom shares more information about it.



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How Resident Evil Village Brought Iconic Monsters to Life

A few months out from its release, it’s clear that Resident Evil Village‘s lasting legacy will be its characters. That was clear early on when Capcom first introduced the instantly iconic Lady Dimitrescu, but the final product only solidified it. Villains like Angie and Moreau have left a lasting impression, giving the 25-year-old franchise its most memorable characters to date.

That’s an especially notable win for Resident Evil as a whole. Despite being a beloved horror franchise, characters and acting weren’t always its strong suit. The first game in the series features notoriously wooden performances that turned the game into a meme-filled laughing stock. That’s changed significantly over the last few years thanks to motion capture. Resident Evil 7 was the first game in the series to adopt full performance capture, raising the bar for storytelling and cutting back on the stiff video game acting of yesteryear. Resident Evil Village only ups the ante by giving the series its best performances to date.

I spoke to Resident Evil Village‘s Presentation Director Masato Miyazaki about how motion capture brought the game’s eclectic characters to life. Miyazaki explained how embracing the technology has allowed the franchise to grow and produce its most narratively audacious game yet.

How did the motion capture process in Village differ from previous Resident Evil games?

We’ve been doing motion capture for many years now, and I’d like to believe we’ve accumulated quite a bit of knowledge surrounding it. Rather than change things up and start fresh with Resident Evil Village, it was more about refining our workflow to be as streamlined and efficient as possible.

For example, when we were working on Resident Evil 7, we experienced a bit of loss in communication between the scenario writers, cinematographers, actors, and studio staff. We took a look at how we could improve from there and applied it to subsequent titles such as Resident Evil 2. By the time we were working on Resident Evil Village, we were able to troubleshoot a lot of previous issues that allowed us to purely focus on making sure we got the best acting performance.

In other words, rather than worrying about logistics and production, we were able to focus more of our efforts entirely on creativity.

The lycans are much faster and more erratic than traditional Resident Evil enemies. Was it tricky for the team to adjust to that change?

Simply put, it was quite difficult. I spent a lot of time trying to figure out the optimal movement of the lycans. We went through many discussions within the team about the best approach and speed a lycan should take when hunting the player. The motif of the lycan was that of a werewolf, so we also struggled with finding the right types of movement that would best showcase this.

We frequently find that we spend an exceptional amount of time working on the main adversary of any Resident Evil title, and this was no different when tackling the development of the lycan.

Village’s villains come in all shapes and sizes, literally. Were there any special rigs or techniques you used to capture characters like Moreau or Angie?

We take special care in building the character rigs as meticulously as possible so that they gracefully handle as much of the physical differences between the actor and the in-game character. Moreau’s spine is greatly distorted, and Angie is a puppet with fewer joints than a human. The studio engineers put a lot of effort into making sure that the actors’ movements are effectively transferred to the CG characters.

Heisenberg's actor in full motion capture for Resident Evil Village.

Of course, that is not enough to effectively transfer the actors’ performances into the game. We also took care in crafting the backgrounds for each scene as well. For example, in scenes where Dimitrescu interacts with other characters, we set up backgrounds that fit the scale of each character. This way, it wouldn’t impede the performance of the actors and would account for the size differences between the actors and how the characters may appear in game.

Was Lady Dimitrescu’s boss form motion captured, and if so, what in the world did that look like on set?

It’s actually a hybrid of animation and motion capture. In order to recreate the movements of monsters, we need actors with special physical capabilities. For this title, we were able to work with an action stuntman from a famous amusement park. He’s done great work for us in the past and helped breathe life into the Licker enemy that you see in many previous Resident Evil titles. His performance provides photorealistic movements as a baseline guide. The animators then brush up on the movements to properly correct and exaggerate them as per the monster’s skeleton.

How do you capture characters that are so physically different and still make it feel like they’re all part of the same cohesive world?

I think this really encapsulates the core challenge that we faced in developing this game. One of the concepts of Resident Evil Village was creating a theme park of horror that offered the player many different frights and terrors. While this is advantageous in giving different forms of entertainment, one misstep would create a lot of disparity and throw the player out of an immersive experience.

Resident Evil Village House Beneviento

As such, we went through each component and made sure they fit within the overarching world and theme of “survival horror.” We figured that would be the best approach in unifying so many differing themes together. That was where the idea of the “village” came into play. When looking at each component individually, they may look different from one another, but it all becomes one cohesive unit when viewed under one “village” lens. It creates the illusion that such a place could potentially exist. When players enjoy one location and move on in anticipation of the next experience, we felt the cohesive environment would heighten this level of immersion and enjoyment.

Rather than creating similar designs in an attempt to consolidate the look and feel of the world, we took the opposite approach in refining and differentiating each character in hopes of creating a more memorable and impactful world.

How has working with actors on a physical set changed what the team has been able to accomplish with this franchise in recent years?

It wasn’t until Resident Evil 5 that we started shooting full-scale cutscenes for the franchise. Over the past 12 years, the expectation for quality has definitely increased, not just from a visual standpoint, but from a performance standpoint as well.

Resident Evil Village's actors motion capture the game's shocking Mia scene.

Therefore, we adopted full performance capture starting from Resident Evil 7. We also revisited the way we work with the actors. Up until Resident Evil 6, Capcom had been giving relatively detailed acting instructions, but that tended to result in very similar performances that didn’t allow us to utilize the talents of the actors.

In recent years, Capcom has limited the briefs to the essentials, such as the concept, production structure, and script, in order to let the actors perform as freely as possible. This makes it easier for the actors to get into the roles, and sometimes the actors give me great suggestions. Of course, there are times when I have to limit the actors’ performances due to technical specifications, but I try not to put any restrictions on them.

As a result, in recent productions, the unnatural acting has been reduced, and I believe that we are able to deliver more authentic acting performances.

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‘Resident Evil Re:Verse’ gets a last-minute delay to 2022

At this point, it’s almost a surprise when a notable game slated for 2021 isn’t delayed. The latest title to slip to 2022 is , the upcoming multiplayer take on the horror franchise. What stands out with this delay, however, is that is putting the release date on ice only a week or two before the game was supposed to drop.

“The previously announced July 2021 launch of Resident Evil Re:Verse is being moved to 2022 so that the team can continue working to deliver a smooth gameplay experience,” the Resident Evil crew . “We will share updated launch details at a later time. Thank you for your patience and understanding.” 

Re:Verse was announced as a freebie for those who own Resident Evil Village. Capcom those who have a physical copy of Village keep their Re:Verse download code in a safe place or add it to their account so they’re ready to roll when the game finally drops.

Re:Verse is effectively a separate deathmatch mode in which between four and six players pick a Resident Evil character and duke it out in short battles. When you die, you return as a zombie. The player with the most points after five minutes wins.

Game development is a complex process where all manner of things can go wrong. We’ve seen time and time again that , especially amid the impact of COVID-19. Pushing back Re:Verse by at least six months at the last minute is a curious case, though. A lengthy delay indicates the game isn’t close to being ready despite the July release window.

Although it’s an add on for a main-series Resident Evil game, the delay will be disappointing to those who were looking forward to Re:Verse. Still, it’s better to have a game that arrives late and works properly from the jump rather than one that needs months of post-launch hotfixes and larger patches .

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