Categories
Game

Riot Games will monitor ‘Valorant’ voice chat to combat disruptive players

Abusive Valorant players could soon have their verbal tirades come back to haunt them. In a published on Friday, Riot Games outlined a plan to begin monitoring in-game voice chat as part of a broader effort to combat disruptive behavior within its games.

On July 13th, the studio will begin collecting voice data from Valorant games played in North America. According to Riot, it will use the data to get its AI model “in a good enough place for a beta launch later this year.” During this initial stage, Riot says it won’t use voice evaluation for disruptive behavior reports.

“We know that before we can even think of expanding this tool, we’ll have to be confident it’s effective, and if mistakes happen, we have systems in place to make sure we can correct any false positives (or negatives for that matter),” the studio said.

Some players will likely bristle at the thought of Riot listening in on their voice comms, much like they did when the company introduced , its kernel-level anti-cheat software. But Riot says it sees voice evaluation as a way for it to “collect clear evidence” against players who take to comms to abuse and harass their teammates. The tool will also give the studio something it can point to when it provides sanctioned players with feedback.

“This is brand new tech and there will for sure be growing pains,” Riot said. “But the promise of a safer and more inclusive environment for everyone who chooses to play is worth it.”

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games titles are coming to Xbox Game Pass with all champions included

At today’s Xbox showcase, Riot Games co-founder Marc Merrill has revealed that the company is making its titles available to Xbox Game Pass subscribers — with all champions and other bonuses included. Members will be able to play League of Legends on PC with all 160 champions unlocked and get first-day access to future champions. They can also play League of Legends: Wild Rift on mobile with all 80 champions. Plus, similar to LoL on PC, they’ll get first-day access to any future champion Riot releases. 

Game Pass members who play Valorant will get all 18 agents, as well, and be among the first ones to be able to use future agents as they become available. For the strategy card game Legends of Runeterra, subscribers will get the Foundations Set, or the first cards released for the game, at no cost. Finally, a Game Pass membership will unlock a rotation of Tier One Little Legend avatars for Teamfight Tactics on PC and mobile.

In addition to game specific bonuses, players will release extra experience across select titles. It also sounds like Riot has more in store for Xbox players, because Merrill wrote in the company’s announcement that it’ll “share more about the partnership and how members can access the Game Pass content” in the coming months. 

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games’ Catalog Can Now Be Played on Epic Games Store

Players will be able to play Riot Games titles like League of Legends and Valorant through the Epic Games Store. In addition to that, Riot and Epic are collaborating to bring Jinx from the upcoming League of Legends animated series to Fortnite.

League of Legends, Valorant, Teamfight Tactics, and Legends of Runeterra are now available to download on the Epic Games Store. When a player downloads these games on the Epic Games Store, they will also download the Riot Games launcher so they can directly access these games.

On the Fortnite side, Jinx from League of Legends is entering the world of Fortnite to help kick off the collaboration. Players will be able to purchase a Jinx skin in the in-game store along with Jinx-themed back bling, loading screens, sprays, and pickaxe. This will be the first official time a League of Legends‘ character will be featured in a game outside of Riot Games.

This crossover coincides with another collaboration that Riot Games has. The upcoming animated series Arcane is releasing on Netflix Saturday, November 6. This series takes place in Zaun and Piltover, two connected cities found in the world of Runeterra, where League of Legends takes place. Jinx will be a main character in Arcane, alongside her sister, Vi. Other characters that have been confirmed in the series are Heimerdinger, Caitlyn, Jayce, and Viktor.

Jinx and her related items will be available in Fortnite starting at 8 p.m. ET today, November 4. Act 1 of the animated series Arcane will be available at 10 p.m. ET on November 6.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot brings ‘League of Legends,’ Valorant’ and other titles to Epic Games Store

Riot Games is taking its PC titles into new territory as , , Teamfight Tactics and Legends of Runeterra are all now available on the . The move could get the four free-to-play titles in front of a wider audience.

You’ll need to install the new Riot Client (which debuted earlier this month), but you can fire up the games from Epic’s app or a desktop shortcut. If you already play any of those games, you’ll still be able to sign in with your account and access your existing friends list.

The partnership between Riot and Epic extends to the latter’s titles too. , marking the first appearance of a LoL character in a non-Riot game.

The collaboration forms part of Riot’s month-long campaign to promote , the League of Legends animated series that . Elsewhere, Riot has also to offer Prime Gaming members some in-game goodies over the next year.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games disables /all chat in ‘League of Legends’

Online games are rife with toxic behavior that can ruin the experience for players who just want to have fun. In an effort to curb verbal abuse in League of Legends, Riot Games has decided to disable /all chats for publicly matchmade games — temporarily, at least. The feature gives players a way to communicate with the opposing team and can be a source of fun banter. Game director Andrei Van Roon and lead game producer Jeremy Lee wrote in their announcement, though, that at the moment, negative interactions outweigh the positives due to the rise of in-game verbal abuse this year.

Teams will still see the other’s emotes and CTRL+1-2-3-4 spam, and the change doesn’t affect the chat function between allies at all. Riot knows there’s still verbal abuse going on within team chats, and that the move won’t eliminate the behavior from the game completely. The developer deems team chats too important to disable, however, since that’s what people use to strategize and coordinate their actions. 

According to Polygon, the reaction to the change has mostly been negative, with people mentioning the fun experiences they’ve had bonding with players from opposing teams. Some even claim that most toxic behavior happens within team chats instead. van Roon has since clarified on Twitter that the plan is to test the change for a couple of patches, starting with patch 11.21, and then ask players for feedback. Riot could choose to keep or reverse the change based on the feedback it gets, though it could also keep it in some regions where the response to it is largely positive

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot reveals major LCS Championship changes over COVID resurgence

League of Legends developer Riot has announced major changes to its 2021 LCS Championship event due to the resurgence of COVID-19 cases in the United States. The biggest change is that these matches will take place not in Newark, New Jersey, as planned, but instead at LA’s LCS Arena. In a statement, Riot said, “We cannot in good conscience conduct a massive fan event at this time.”

Riot explains that it planned the LCS Championship as a ‘road show’ due to the mass COVID-19 vaccine rollout earlier this year. However, public health officials have been raising the alarm over the Delta variant and the number of cases that are increasing across the US, particularly in states with low vaccination rates.

Due to this change in circumstances, some big changes have been made to the esports event, including that all matches will be held at the LCS Arena in Los Angeles instead of at the Prudential Center in New Jersey. As you’d expect, Riot says that it will give full refunds to people who purchased tickets to the events.

This was supposed to be a “sold-out celebration” event, making the decision particularly disappointing. Riot goes on to state, “After assessing the risks, no set of protocols or plans allowed us to deliver that event without jeopardizing the health of our teams, staff and fans.” Fans will not be able to attend the event in person; no tickets at the updated venue will be sold.

Though the change has taken place this year, Riot is optimistic that it will be able to do more next year. As well, a future LCS esports event will take place at the Prudential Center in New Jersey. With uncertainty remaining around the pandemic, variants, and cases, no concrete future plans have been stated.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot moves in-person ‘League of Legends’ championship due to COVID-19 surge

The eSports world is coming to grips with a resurgent COVID-19 threat. As The Verge notes, Riot Games has moved the last two matches of the League of Legends Championship Series (LCS) from Newark, New Jersey’s Prudential Center to the LCS Arena in Los Angeles. The US spread of the new coronavirus’ Delta variant has made it impractical to hold the large in-person event “in good conscience” even with vaccines in use, Riot said.

The LCS Arena is a “safer” location that will protect the health of Worlds representatives before they go to China, Riot said. While it wasn’t surprised that other events would carry on, the Series didn’t need to put people at risk just to offer its “core competitive product.” LoL teams have played against each other in person at LCS Arena over the summer, but even those were derailed in favor of virtual competition after people associated with two teams tested positive for COVID-19.

The developer promised events at Prudential Center in the future, and said it would offer full refunds. More details would be coming soon, Riot added.

Other eSports leagues, such as the Call of Duty League, have pressed forward with in-person events in spite of the virus surge. However, Riot’s decision suggests that at least some organizers are having a change of heart. We wouldn’t be surprised if others followed suit, at least until vaccine use climbs and cases (hopefully) drop again.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games releases an album of royalty-free music for Twitch streamers

Riot Games is no stranger to making music. With K/DA, the studio has one of the world’s most popular virtual bands, but it’s latest musical project is different. On Friday, Riot released Sessions: Vi, a 37-track album of instrumental beats with contributions from artists like Chromonicci and Junior State. What makes the release special is that streamers and content creators can use all the songs from Sessions: Vi for free.

Riot hopes the album and future ones like it will help ease some of the copyright headaches Twitch streamers have had to deal with for much of the past year. At the start of last June, Twitch got a “sudden influx” of DMCA takedown notices. The majority of those targeted archived broadcasts that had been up on the platform for years. The company has tried in a variety of ways to prevent more takedown notifications from coming in, but those efforts don’t seem to have addressed the problem. That’s because in May Twitch said it received another batch of approximately 1,000 individual DMCA notifications. For some streamers, those notices represent a potential ban from the service.

You can stream Sessions: Vi on Apple Music, Spotify and YouTube

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games releases album with free music for streamers and creators

If you’re a streamer or video creator who is paranoid about getting hit with a copyright strike, Riot Games has a new solution. The company has launched “Sessions: Vi,” a new album of “completely free” music for creators and streamers to use during their live streams, in their videos, and more — even if they monetize their content.

Put simply, you can’t use just any music track for your live streams and videos; they’ll result in a copyright strike, which could involve anything from losing the ability to monetize a video to jeopardizing one’s account. Paying for a music license is an option, but those who can’t afford to do this are left with using royalty-free music which often comes with an upfront cost.

Riot Games Music has released “Sessions: Vi” as a free album for anyone to use; you can, for example, play it in the background while streaming a game to add some ambiance to your video or you can add it as a soundtrack for non-live videos uploaded to platforms like YouTube and TikTok. Riot’s full guidelines for using the content can be found here.

The full album has been uploaded to YouTube, as well as major platforms like Apple Music, Deezer, Amazon Music, and Spotify. These platforms are your best option if you want to stream music in the background during a video. Alternatively, you can head over to Riot’s Sessions web page to download the album.

Downloading the album will give you access to the 37 tracks on it, which can be added to your projects using video editing software. Riot says this won’t be the only album of free music offered to streamers and creators. Though we don’t know when the next album will drop (and if it’ll focus on a different genre), the company says it’ll provide updates on its social media accounts when it releases the next album later this year.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Riot Games Bans TSM’s New Team Name Following Crypto Deal

Esports team SoloMid, also known as TSM, signed a $210 million dollar deal today with FTX, a cryptocurrency company, for the right to change the team’s name. With this deal, TSM will now be known as “TSM FTX,” with FTX’s branding on the team’s jerseys and the team’s social media accounts.

However, FTX’s branding will not be displayed on the League of Legends and Valorant teams per Riot Games’ strict rules on cryptocurrency and sponsorships.

TSM is currently considered one of the top competitive esports companies in the world, with active teams in the majority of esports scenes such as League of Legends, Fortnite, and Rainbow Six Siege.

The deal between the Hong Kong-based cryptocurrency company and TSM ensures that the esports team will be paid $210 million over the course of 10 years in exchange for FTX changing the team’s name to “TSM FTX.” The last time TSM had a similar deal, Qualcomm renamed the team to “TSM Snapdragon” in 2013.

This deal does not change the branding for the TSM teams that are playing in the LCS (League Championship Series) for League of Legends or for competitive Valorant. Riot Games, the developer of these games, has strict rules on what sponsorships esports teams are allowed to take. It does not condone team-specific sponsorships from gambling, cryptocurrency, or alcohol-related companies.

According to Dot eSports, this exclusion was established while the deal was being created. TSM FTX’s branding will be maintained for the teams playing esports games from Riot Games, just outside of Riot Games’ official broadcasts.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link