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Computing

How to Undo Changes in Keynote on Mac

With Keynote on Mac, you can create brilliant presentations for business, education, and even personal projects. But not everything goes as planned when you build a slideshow. You may add an image, type text, or make a formatting change that you wish you hadn’t.

With the Undo feature in Keynote, you can erase your last action. Whether you add an element you want to immediately remove or make a formatting change that doesn’t work out, Undo is your digital eraser in Keynote.

Undo your last action in Keynote

Sandy Writtenhouse/Digital Trends

If you want to undo the last action you performed in Keynote on Mac, click Edit > Undo in the Menu Bar.

To confirm you’re undoing what you intend, you’ll also see what that last action was. As an example, if you just typed a word, it would show Undo Typing; if you deleted an image, it would show Undo Delete.

When you click Undo, you should see that the last action is undone.

If you prefer to use a keyboard shortcut instead of the menu bar, press Command + Z to undo an action.

Undo your last several actions

Click Edit, Undo Insert on MacOS.
Sandy Writtenhouse/Digital Trends

The Undo feature in Keynote isn’t just a one-time eraser. You can continue to undo previous actions.

For example, let’s say you insert a shape and then type text inside of it. When you click Edit, you’ll see Undo Typing because that was the last action. If you select that and then go back to Edit, you’ll then see Undo Insert because that action came before the typing.

The key is that you can continue to undo each previous action in order. However, you cannot jump to specific actions in between.

If you use the keyboard shortcut mentioned above, Command + Z, you can continue to press this key combination to undo each action in order.

Redo your last action in Keynote

Edit, Redo Insert menu on MacOS.
Sandy Writtenhouse/Digital Trends

The counterpart to Undo in Keynote is Redo. Redo is like the eraser for the eraser that lets you redo something you just undid.

For instance, let’s say you insert a table on your slide, change your mind, and click Edit > Undo Insert to remove the table. You can then go to Edit > Redo Insert to put the table back.

Redo works just like the Undo feature. You’ll see the last action next to it in the menu and can continue to redo each action you previously undid.

If you prefer to use a keyboard shortcut instead of the menu bar, press Shift + Command + Z to redo an action. Like the keyboard shortcut for Undo, you can continue to press this key combination to redo each action in order.

Undo or Redo grayed out?

Undo and Redo grayed out.
Sandy Writtenhouse/Digital Trends

If you click Edit in the Menu Bar with the intent to undo or redo an action and one or both are grayed out, there’s a reason: There are no further actions to undo or redo.

Additionally, if you close your presentation and reopen it, you won’t have the Undo or Redo options until you perform a new action. You can save your presentation and still use Undo or Redo, but once you close the slideshow, you’ll start a new set of actions when you reopen it.

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Categories
Tech News

Twitter’s subscription service may cost $2.99 a month and have an ‘undo tweet’ feature

Twitter’s upcoming subscription service may cost $2.99 per month and include an “undo tweet” button and “Collections” feature, according to app researcher Jane Manchun Wong.

Wong, who’s renowned for finding hidden app features before they’re released, tweeted a screenshot of the platform, tentatively titled Twitter Blue.

She said the company is also working on a tiered subscription model, which could give higher-paying users access to extra features, such as a “clutter-free news reading experience.”

[Read moreThis dude drove an EV from the Netherlands to New Zealand — here are his 3 top road trip tips]

Th Undo Tweet button would function in a similar way to Gmail’s “Undo Send” timer, giving users a brief window of time in which they can recall a tweet before it’s posted. Wong first revealed that Twitter was working on the feature back in March.

It’s not quite the edit button Twitter users have been demanding for years, but it may be the closest we get to it for the foreseeable future.

The Collections feature, meanwhile, would allow users to save and organize their favorite tweets so that they’re easier to find.

I wouldn’t part with my hard-earned cash for those two tools alone, but Wong expects that the feature set — and pricing — could change before the launch.

Just don’t expect the finished product to include an edit button. Twitter boss Jack Dorsey said last year that the company will “probably never do it.”

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Categories
Tech News

There’s more evidence Twitter is testing an ‘undo’ button, but it’ll cost you

A few weeks ago, we reported that Twitter was testing some kind of ‘Undo Send’ timer for tweets. This isn’t exactly the edit button everyone has been wishing for, but it would give users a few seconds to take back a bad tweet without anyone noticing. Developer Jane Manchun Wong has now surfaced more evidence that Twitter is working on the feature, but it comes with one caveat: you might have to pay for it.

As noted by Wong, the ‘undo tweet’ is seemingly meant to be a subscriber-only feature; you’d have to pay to access it. Of course, this is a leak, and anything can change between now and whenever the feature goes public (if it ever does). Still, Twitter has been looking into more ways to monetize its platform recently, so it’s not a complete surprise it might keep some features behind a paywall.

As a recap, Wong was the one who originally found evidence of Twitter’s tweet timer. It looked something like this:

The feature seems to work something like Gmail’s undo button, where the service simply waits a few seconds before actually sending out your message. On the surface, that’s not much more useful than simply deleting a tweet immediately after sending it, but if you have a large number of followers it could help make sure nobody ever sees an embarrassing mistake.

Considering how many people have been asking for an edit button, you’d think Twitter might offer an undo button as a freebie compromise, but it looks like you’ll have to pay up instead. It remains to be seen whether a few extra features will enough to get people to pay for Twitter.

Did you know we have a newsletter all about consumer tech? It’s called Plugged In –
and you can subscribe to it right here.

Published March 20, 2021 — 19:57 UTC



Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Tech News

There’s more evidence Twitter is testing an ‘undo’ button, but it’ll cost you

A few weeks ago, we reported that Twitter was testing some kind of ‘Undo Send’ timer for tweets. This isn’t exactly the edit button everyone has been wishing for, but it would give users a few seconds to take back a bad tweet without anyone noticing. Developer Jane Manchun Wong has now surfaced more evidence that Twitter is working on the feature, but it comes with one caveat: you might have to pay for it.

As noted by Wong, the ‘undo tweet’ is seemingly meant to be a subscriber-only feature; you’d have to pay to access it. Of course, this is a leak, and anything can change between now and whenever the feature goes public (if it ever does). Still, Twitter has been looking into more ways to monetize its platform recently, so it’s not a complete surprise it might keep some features behind a paywall.

As a recap, Wong was the one who originally found evidence of Twitter’s tweet timer. It looked something like this:

The feature seems to work something like Gmail’s undo button, where the service simply waits a few seconds before actually sending out your message. On the surface, that’s not much more useful than simply deleting a tweet immediately after sending it, but if you have a large number of followers it could help make sure nobody ever sees an embarrassing mistake.

Considering how many people have been asking for an edit button, you’d think Twitter might offer an undo button as a freebie compromise, but it looks like you’ll have to pay up instead. It remains to be seen whether a few extra features will enough to get people to pay for Twitter.


on Jane Manchun Wong



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Categories
Tech News

Twitter Undo button test lets users stop typo Tweets in their tracks

In recent weeks and months, Twitter has been either testing or rolling out a number of new features, and today the company was spotted testing a feature that’s bound to make a lot of users happy. Twitter is apparently testing an undo timer for sent tweets, allowing users to quickly change their minds and scrap tweets shortly after hitting the “Send” button.

While that does essentially have the same effect of deleting a tweet you’ve already published, with an undo feature you’re preventing anyone from ever seeing the tweet in question. Not only could such a feature be good for those times where you spot a typo as you’re hitting the “Send” button, but it will also obviously come in handy for those times where you’re tweeting impulsively and probably shouldn’t be.

The new feature was spotted by social media sleuth Jane Manchun Wong today, who published a gif of the “Undo” button that appears after sending a tweet. The button hangs around for a few seconds, giving users a brief window to tap it before it disappears. It also appears that hitting that Undo button will open up the editor with your original tweet again, giving you the chance to fix any typos you may have spotted at the last minute.

Wong’s tweet doesn’t give us any other information about this test. We don’t know how broad it is, who gets to test it, or how long it’s been in testing. Of course, since Wong isn’t a Twitter employee, we wouldn’t necessarily expect her to uncover this stuff just through datamining, so we’re left waiting to see if Twitter announces anything about this test on its own.

That said, an “Undo” button would clearly be a step in the right direction for users who have been asking for the ability to edit tweets, and it would probably prove to be popular with the Twitter user base as a whole. We’ll see what happens from here, and we’ll let you know if Twitter announces anything regarding the “Undo” button in the future.

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