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Valve says it will ship all current Steam Deck reservations by the end of 2022

If you’ve been patiently waiting for to ship that you reserved months ago, you may not have to wait too much longer to get your hands on the device. The company claims it will be able to fulfill all current Steam Deck reservations by the end of the year.

that many of its supply chain issues are easing and it’s able to continue increasing production. It has moved some people’s scheduled deliveries up to the third quarter (i.e. between now and the end of September). All other outstanding reservations are now scheduled for delivery in Q4. People who lock in a reservation right now should still be able to get one in time for the holiday season. After Valve reaches its capacity for that period, it will start filling up the delivery queue for early 2023. 

The update comes a month after Valve said it was . This is a rare sliver of positive news for a sought-after piece of gaming hardware, given the supply chain problems that have stymied and production. Who knows? We might even see the Steam Deck on retail shelves before too long.

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Valve ramps up production to ‘more than double’ Steam Deck shipments

There’s some good news if you’ve been waiting to get your hands on a . Valve says it has and will be more than twice the number of units each week than it has over the last few months.

The company planned to start shipping the device in December, but supply chain issues forced it to the Steam Deck . It now appears has found the parts and production capacity it needs to build units at a faster pace and get them out to customers more quickly.

Were you to reserve a Steam Deck now, you likely wouldn’t receive it until at least October. However, since Valve is the volume of shipments, it may be able to bring down the wait time. Hopefully, it will soon get to the point where it can ship a Steam Deck within days of someone deciding to order one. 

Valve says those who had an expected shipment window of Q3 will start receiving reservation emails on June 30th. When you do eventually get your Steam Deck, though, it’s probably best to avoid swapping out the built-in storage. Valve hardware designer Lawrence Yang that the power requirements of off-the-shelf SSDs could cause a Steam Deck to overheat and shorten the lifespan.

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Valve warns against squeezing a larger SSD into your Steam Deck

Valve loves to warn people about about the risks of do-it-yourself Steam Deck maintenance, and that now extends to upgrading the storage. In a response to a PC Gamer article on modding the Steam Deck, Valve hardware designer Lawrence Yang warned against upgrading the device’s NVMe SSD. While it’s technically possible, the M.2 2242 drives (22mm wide by 42mm long) you frequently find in stores are hotter and more power-hungry than the 2230 models (22mm x 30mm) the handheld was meant to support. You could “significantly shorten” the longevity of the system, Yang said, adding that you shouldn’t move thermal pads.

The PC Gamer story referenced modder Belly Jelly’s discovery (initially reported by Hot Hardware) that it was possible to fit an M.2 2242 SSD in the Steam Deck, albeit with some design sacrifices. There were already concerns this might lead to overheating problems. Yang just explained why it’s a bad idea, and outlined the likely long-term consequences.

The alert might be a letdown if you feel limited by Valve’s maximum 512GB storage and don’t think a microSD card (typically much slower than an SSD) is an adequate substitute. With that said, it’s not shocking — mobile devices like this often have size and thermal constraints that make it impractical to upgrade at least some components.

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Valve further delays Steam Deck dock due to supply shortages

You’ll have to be patient if you want an official way to turn your Steam Deck into a makeshift desktop. As The Verge notes, Valve has indefinitely delayed its Steam Deck Docking Station due to a combination of supply shortages and pandemic-related manufacturing shutdowns. The company said it was “improving the situation” and would share more info when available.

The setback won’t affect production and reservation windows for the Steam Deck itself, Valve said. In the interim, the company vowed to upgrade support for third-party USB-C hubs and external monitors.

The Docking Station cradles the Steam Deck while providing display, Ethernet and USB connections. It was announced alongside the handheld system, but wasn’t available when the Steam Deck first reached customers. Valve still lists the release as “late spring.” The delay won’t preclude you from using the Steam Deck as a PC or attaching it to a TV, but generic hubs clearly won’t be as elegant as a dock built with the console in mind.

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‘Arma 3’ and ‘DayZ’ add BattlEye anti-cheat support through Valve Proton

While there are still many unknowns about ’s library of games, you can add four titles to the list that will work on day one. On Friday, Arma 3, DayZ, Unturned and Planetside 2 now all feature working BattlEye anti-cheat support when playing them through Proton. They join Ark: Survival Evolved and Mount and Blade II: Bannerlord for a total of six Windows titles that Linux users can play through the compatibility layer without the anti-cheat software causing issues. 

No matter how you frame it, only four new titles joining the compatibility list is a modest addition, particularly when you consider Valve said in November BattlEye integration on Proton had progressed to the point where all a developer had to do was contact the company to enable the feature within their game. The current list also doesn’t cover some of the most popular online multiplayer games on Steam, including the likes of Rainbow Six Siege and PUBG. We still don’t have a full picture of all the games that will work with Steam Deck’s Linux-based operating system, but that’s something Valve promised to clear up through a new before the handheld launches in .

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Valve reveals dates for Steam’s Halloween, autumn and winter sales

Even though usually keeps the dates of sales close to the chest until almost the time they go live, the details usually end up leaking anyway. This time, though, Valve is getting ahead of the curve. It confirmed when the next three sales will take place.

As spotted by , the Steamworks Documentation page notes that the Steam Halloween sale is this weekend and it runs between October 28th and November 1st. The autumn sale will take place from November 24th-30th. As for the Steam winter sale, one of the platform’s two biggest sales of the year alongside the summer edition, you’ll be able to score discounts on a ton of games between December 22nd and January 5th.

It’s not a bad idea to reveal the dates well in advance. Steam connoisseurs know the sales are coming anyway and the dates are less important than announcing which games will be included beforehand. If a player knows that a game they want to buy will likely get a hefty discount in a couple of months, they’ll be less inclined to buy it now. In any case, Steam users now know when they’ll be able to stockpile games for their .

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Valve will replace Big Picture mode with the new Steam Deck UI

The upcoming Steam Deck handheld could shape more than just Valve’s hardware fortunes. According to a Steam forum post from a Valve employee, the console’s user interface will replace Steam’s Big Picture mode, a front-end for your games that’s compatible with bigger displays, TVs and controllers. A slick new UI will probably be welcomed by those who believe the almost decade-old Big Picture mode is on its last legs. In fact, the feature hasn’t really been visually updated much since its launch.

Valve surprised everyone last week by dropping the Steam Deck — a Switch-like hybrid console for PC gaming — out of the blue. Pre-orders were swiftly opened for the device, which comes in three variants with different storage sizes priced at $399, $529 and $649. The Steam Deck features a custom Linux-based SteamOS. As it’s designed to be ported to TVs, it’s not hard to envision the console’s UI becoming a natural successor to Big Picture Mode.

Shedding light on the Steam Deck’s UI for IGN, Valve designer Tucker Spofford said the home screen will let you continue the game you’re playing, see what your friends are doing, see what’s new in the store and your library and get recommendations.

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Valve announces a $1 million ‘CS:GO’ art contest

is on the lookout for new weapon skins, and it’s hoping to entice creators to submit designs with . The company will select 10 original, dream-themed looks. The creators of the winning designs will each receive $100,000 and the skins will be added to the game.

You can send in as many designs as you like and create them either solo or as part of a team. You can also have multiple winning skins.

Artists will still own the rights to their creations — sending in an entry gives Valve a non-exclusive license to use it in . You’ll have until October 21st to submit your designs to the CS:GO Workshop. You’ll need to use a Steam account that’s in good standing (i.e. it hasn’t been limited in any way) which has made at least $5 of Steam purchases. Valve will contact the winners by November 21st.

This is a neat contest with potentially life-changing prizes. The Steam Workshop has been around for a decade. It allows players to upload mods, maps and items for a variety of games — including weapon skins for CS:GO

“Over five million content creators have submitted and published over 20 million new items for a variety of games on Steam, making them available for purchase to millions of gamers around the world,” Valve said. “And, as everyone who plays these games knows — including CS players — many of the most iconic in-game items, maps, and more have been authored by members of the community. The Dreams & Nightmares Content Contest is designed to help further support this community.”

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Valve boss says ‘very aggressive’ Steam Deck pricing was ‘painful’

Yesterday, Valve revealed the Steam Deck, a handheld gaming PC that is meant primarily for playing Steam games on the go. In its announcement, Valve confirmed that the Steam Deck will use a custom AMD Zen 2 CPU and a discrete RDNA 2 GPU, yet announced a starting price point of $399. That’s a pretty low price to pay to get into PC gaming, and it seems that Valve is going to feel it, as Gabe Newell has described that pricing as “very aggressive” and “painful.”

Speaking in an interview with IGN, Newell said that the most important thing about Steam Deck was getting the feel and performance correct, with pricing playing second fiddle. “I want to pick this up and say, oh, it all works,” Newell said. “It’s all fast. It’s all… and then price point was secondary and painful. But that was pretty clearly a critical aspect to it. But the first thing was the performance and the experience, [that] was the biggest and most fundamental constraint that was driving this.”

Newell told IGN that “very aggressive” pricing is needed to get ahead in the mobile space, and that’s precisely what the Steam Deck has. While he didn’t say how much profit Valve is making on Steam Deck – if it’s making any – it’s hard to believe that there’s much of a margin at all on a device with the Steam Deck’s spec sheet priced at $400.

Regardless, Newell told IGN that Valve is attempting to set the Steam Deck up for long-term success, even if that means slim or nonexistent margins. “Nobody has ever said, ‘Oh, we have a giant success where clearly there’s huge demand for this, but our margins are too thin.’ Right? And a lot of people have overpriced things and killed the opportunity, and sort of convince people that it’s an uninteresting category from the get-go,” he said. “So we’re definitely… our view is… we’re doing this for the long haul. And there’s a lot of opportunity.”

Of course, platform holders losing money on device sales – especially in the early days of their device’s lifespan – is nothing new in the gaming industry. However, it’s also worth keeping in mind that even if Valve will lose money on each Steam Deck sold, it still takes a cut of every game sold on Steam and every microtransaction processed using Steam’s payment systems. So if the Steam Deck ultimately helps sell more games through Steam, the Valve stands to make a pretty penny despite whatever losses it might experience on the hardware itself.

Steam Deck reservations open later today, though there’s some fine print you should consider before you reserve a handheld for yourself. Valve expects to begin shipping out Steam Deck purchases in December 2021 but hasn’t given us a specific release date yet.

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Steam Deck reservations open today: Why Valve may not sell you one

After announcing the Steam Deck yesterday, Valve is wasting little time opening up reservations for the handheld PC gaming device. Reservations are opening later today for the first batch of Steam Decks that will be available in December 2021. Here we’ll tell you not only how to reserve one, but also what you should know before reserving.

The reservation process is slightly strange because of Valve’s efforts to stop scalpers from snatching up all of the available stock. Reservations open at 10 AM PDT/1 PM EDT today over on the Steam store, where three different configurations of the Steam Deck are listed: One with 64GB of eMMC storage for $399, another with a 256GB NVMe SSD for $529, and a third with a 512GB NVMe SSD for $649.

You’ll get a carrying case regardless of the model you pick, and though there are some bonuses in the two more expensive models (such as anti-glare glass in the 512GB model), you’re mostly paying extra for increased storage. Keep in mind that each model comes with a microSD slot, and on the 64GB model in particular, you’ll probably need to make use of it, given the size of many modern games.

If you’re reserving a Steam Deck today, you don’t need to pay the entire purchase price upfront. Instead, you only need to put $5 down today, and that will either be refunded if you cancel your reservation before release or put toward the cost of your Steam Deck when it comes time to buy in December.

When the Steam Deck releases in December, Valve will notify Steam users in the order these reservations were received. However, reservations are only open today in the launch regions for the Steam Deck, with those being the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, and Canada. While Valve says that information about expanded region availability is coming soon, so far, those are the only regions of the world confirmed for the Steam Deck.

The good news is that the reservation queue will be regional, meaning if you’re a US-based customer reserving a Steam Deck, you’ll only be in line with other US customers when orders open up later this year.

These next few parts are particularly important: you’ll need a Steam account to reserve a Steam Deck, and if you want to reserve one today, you’ll need to do it with an established account in good standing that purchased something before June 2021. If you don’t have an established Steam account like that and are creating a new one to order a Steam Deck, you’ll still be able to do it, but you’ll have to wait 48 hours before you can reserve one. For freshly-created Steam accounts, it seems that reservations open on Sunday, July 18th at 10 AM PDT/1 PM EDT.

Steam is also only allowing one Steam Deck reservation per customer, and it must be noted that you can’t change the Steam Deck model you want to buy after you place your reservation. In other words, if you place a reservation for a 64GB Steam Deck today, then the 64GB Steam Deck will be the only one you’ll have the opportunity to buy when actual orders happen in December.

That’s all you should know about Steam Deck reservations, but there’s also a comprehensive FAQ on the Steam Deck page that answers most of the questions you should have about the process. On paper, at least, the Steam Deck sounds like an impressive piece of kit, so expect a lot of people to be interested in placing a reservation today.

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