Categories
Security

Apple demos Safari’s ‘passkeys’ support in macOS Ventura that will help bring an end to passwords

At its WWDC 2022 event, Apple just demonstrated how Safari in macOS Ventura will support “passkeys,” a sign-in standard that’s built with cross-platform support to enable logins that don’t use passwords at all. Apple isn’t alone in this effort either, as last month Google and Microsoft joined with Apple to announce their new step forward for a long-in-development plot to kill passwords once and for all.

By avoiding the use of passwords entirely, they should prevent users from falling victim to phishing attacks, social engineering, or bot attacks that plug in passwords snagged from databases of leaked passwords. Instead, you can use a device (like your phone or computer) as your primary authentication device, so using Face ID or Touch ID or entering the device PIN will be enough for you to log in on various services across the web.

Apple showed how the “passkeys” are backed up within the iCloud Keychain enabling syncing across Mac, iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV, with end-to-end encryption in place, as well as the QR codes you’d use to pair your phone with the system. When you use them to sign in to a service, the actual keys remain on your device, which is another measure to keep them secured.

This passwordless authentication standard is established by the FIDO Alliance and promises support across different platforms. Apple, Google, and Microsoft said they expect to support the new system on their platforms within the next year, and judging by this demonstration, macOS Ventura and iOS 16 will be among the first ways to try it out.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Security

iOS 16 and macOS Ventura include Apple’s new Rapid Security Response

As part of today’s announcements at WWDC 2022, Apple briefly mentioned a new addition to its security tools that will apply to iPhone, iPad, and Mac platforms called Rapid Security Response. It didn’t go into a lot of detail about what Rapid Security Response is, but Apple is promising to have important security updates that get to your devices even faster. Currently, iOS and macOS users get their security updates rolled in with full system patches, usually with .1 or .0.1 version numbers, which can take quite some time for users to download and install.

Now, Apple says its Rapid Security Response updates include important security improvements that “can be applied automatically between standard software updates.” MacRumors reports that for users who’ve installed the iOS 16 developer beta, there’s a new toggle under the Automatic Updates section of settings for “Install System and Data Files” to apply new security configuration and system data files. It says that “some updates may only take effect once you restart your iPhone,” which suggests that some won’t require a reboot.

That’s the case on macOS Ventura, where Apple’s breakdown of the new features coming in version 13.0 includes the Rapid Security Response, however on this platform “This isn’t a standard software update. These improvements can be applied automatically between normal updates — without a restart.” The Verge has contacted Apple for more information about the new updates, and with beta testers already running the new software, we should know more about how they work soon.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Computing

How to download the MacOS Ventura beta right now

Apple’s newest operating system, MacOS Ventura, will be coming out this fall. It brings improvements to multitasking with Stage Manager, as well as new ways to bring your iPhone closer to your Mac. All that said, you might be wondering how (and when) you can download MacOS Ventura.

As of writing in June, MacOS Ventura is only in a developer beta stage. That means you’ll have to pay the $100 fee and sign up for the Apple Developer program to enroll your Mac to get the new OS. Come July, though, MacOS Ventura will head to the public for free beta testing through the Apple Beta Software Program. We’ve got all these methods for downloading MacOS Ventura covered in this handy guide.


Apple

A warning

We do have a warning before getting into the specifics. MacOS Ventura is still in developer beta. It also only works with select Mac models, which we list here.

There will be lots of bugs that impact the performance of your Mac if you choose to install it in this early stage. You’ll also need to backup your Mac via Time Machine before you install it. In addition, we also advise downloading and then creating a bootable USB installer for the version of MacOS that came with your Mac.

This is so that if you have issues, you can do a restore of your original MacOS version if Apple’s built-in Internet Recovery feature fails to reinstall the OS that came with your Mac. So do proceed at your own risk, as Digital Trends can not be held liable for damages to your Mac.

The terms of the Apple Developer Program.

Install through the Apple Developer Program

To begin installing MacOS Ventura, you’ll need to enroll in the Apple Developer Program using Safari on your Mac. If you haven’t already, visit Apple’s website for details on the program and then follow our steps below.

Step 1: Back up your Mac. Then, from the Apple Developer Program Website, click the Enroll button at the top right. Read the terms and agree. You can then click the Start Your Enrollment button at the bottom.

Step 2: Sign in with your Apple ID and password. If you have two-factor authentication set up, enter the code sent to your Apple devices in your web browser. Once you enter it, you can click the Trust button to avoid entering the code again.

Step 3: Purchase a membership for $100. You can turn off auto-renew so you don’t get charged again next year.

Step 4: After you sign in and purchase a license, there should be a new sidebar available for you to view. Items like Membership, Certificate IDs, and Documentation should show up. Under Additional Resources, look for Downloads.

Step 5: You’ll be taken to a web page that lists all of the downloads available for you. Click the Install Profile button next to MacOS 13 Beta.

Step 6: This will download .pkg file. Be sure to note where it is saved.

Step 7: After the .pkg file is downloaded, double click to launch it, and follow the instructions on the screen.

Step 8: Once the Install MacOS Developer Beta Access Utility closes, head to the Apple menu and choose System Preferences, followed by Software Update.

From there, you’ll see that MacOS 13 Beta is listed. Click the Upgrade Now button and wait. The download should take up to an hour, depending on your internet.

Step 9: When finished downloading, the Install MacOS 13 Beta app should open up on your system. If it didn’t, look for it under your applications or refresh and go back to System Preferences to check again for the download. Follow the instructions on your screen, and choose the drive where you want to install MacOS Ventura. Your Mac will reboot a few times, and eventually, you’ll be up and running with the OS.

A screenshot of Apple's public website.

Install through the Apple Beta Software Program in July

While MacOS Ventura has not yet hit the public for free testing, Apple has mentioned that this will happen in July. When it does, you can test through the Apple Beta Software Program. Here’s how.

Step 1: Back up your Mac. Then, sign in to the Apple Beta Software Program website using your Apple ID in Safari on your Mac. You might be prompted to enter a code for two-factor authentication, if set up. Enter the code to proceed.

Step 2: Once signed in, you’ll have to enroll your Mac using the MacOS Public Beta Access Utility. Scroll down in the enroll page and click the blue Download button in step two on the page.

Step 3: Install that utility and follow the instructions on your screen.

Step 4: Once the utility is installed, you can head to the Apple menu and choose System Preferences, followed by Software Update.

Step 5: You’ll see MacOS Public Beta listed. Click the Upgrade Now button. Allow it to download. Eventually, you’ll get a pop-up window with an installer. Follow the directions, and choose the drive for installation. Your Mac will reboot and you’ll have Ventura!

While we won’t get into the specifics, there are ways to get the early developer beta for MacOS Ventura at no cost. Again, you can look into these methods at your own risk. It will involve downloading the same profiles that we’ve mentioned above and following the same steps but skipping out on the $100 fee.

We highly advise against this, though, as the developer beta is highly unstable and downloading profiles from websites not sanctioned by Apple is highly unsafe and possibly illegal. It’s best to wait for you to wait for Apple to work out the bugs and download through the Apple Beta Software Program.

Editors’ Choice




Repost: Original Source and Author Link