Categories
Game

Ubisoft keeps up Assassin’s Creed education trend with Discovery Tour: Viking Age

Ubisoft released the educational iteration of their latest big Assassin’s Creed title Valhalla this week. Like each of the other Assassin’s Creed games that’ve been released over the past half-decade, Ubisoft put a significant amount of work in research into the history of our world and humanity to create an authentic experience with their game. The title Discovery Tour: Viking Age takes the work done for Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla, and puts it in an entirely educational package.

Below you’ll see an official trailer for Discovery Tour: Viking Age. Per Ubisoft, this title allows the user to “plunge into a unique interactive experience where you learn about history, traditions, and famous characters of the Viking era.” This title runs from Norway to England, from England to “the mythological Viking realms.”

For those users that already own Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, this Discovery Tour is entirely free. You’ll just need to hit the update button for the game you already have downloaded.

The game Discovery Tour: Viking Age will also be available for download separate from the Assassin’s Creed Valhalla game. You’ll find this title as a PC Standalone version right now, and it’ll be available on other platforms in the year 2022. We’ll know more about exact release dates soon!

At this moment in our real world history, Ubisoft has released three “Discovery Tour” titles. There is one for Ancient Egypt, one for Ancient Greece, and another for the Viking Age. The Viking Age title comes from Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, Greece from AC Odyssey, and Egypt from AC Origins.

In addition to appearing as standalone titles, each Discovery Tour is available as a game mode within its related Assassin’s Creed game. Now, if only we could go back and get the same sort of thing for titles like Assassin’s Creed: Unity for the French Revolution in Paris – that’d make our day.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age

Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tours can offer valuable educational insights into historical periods, and that may be particularly true for the latest instalment. Ubisoft has released a Discovery Tour: Viking Age update for Assassin’s Creed Valhalla that gives you the chance to explore Viking-era England and Norway without the usual conflicts. There’s a new format, however. Rather than go on guided tours and visit exhibits, you assume the roles of four Anglo-Saxon and Viking characters (such as Anglo-Saxon king Alfred the Great and a Viking merchant) as they undertake eight quests that illustrate their daily lives.

You can also study period artifacts from museums in the UK, France and Denmark. And yes, there are rewards to unlock in the main Valhalla game for Eivor and his longship.

The Discovery Tour update is free for Valhalla players on all platforms, and you can buy the $20 stand-alone version for PCs through either Ubisoft’s store or the Epic Games Store. Console and streaming players will have to wait until 2022 for a stand-alone release. However you get a copy, it could be a worthwhile experience if you’ve wanted to dispel the myths surrounding Vikings and their conquests.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

‘Tribes of Midgard’ blends survival, RPG and co-op mechanics for a new kind of Viking game

When Geoff Keighley introduced Tribes of Midgard during the Summer Game Fest kickoff stream on June 10th, he almost stumbled over its description.

“Stave off Ragnarök in this ancient Norse-inspired co-op action survival RPG that you can also fully play solo,” he said, slowing down his speech and smiling when he got to the end, clearly relieved.

The elevator pitch for Tribes of Midgard is a mouthful, but it’s also the only way to really explain what the game is all about. It doesn’t cleanly fit into a single genre: It’s playable solo or with up to 10 people; it twists mechanics made popular by titles like Don’t Starve Together and Diablo, and it offers all of this in a procedurally generated, auto-scaling, giant-infested ancient Norse landscape.

Tribes of Midgard

Norsfell

“It’s a brand new genre,” said Julian Maroda, CEO of Tribes of Midgard studio, Norsfell. “That was really at the starting point of what we wanted to do, was to take a couple of genres and then bring them together to make an experience that’s highly accessible.”

One of the game’s most innovative aspects is its approach to death in the survival genre. In Tribes of Midgard, the goal is to protect the Seed of Yggdrasil, the mystical tree at the center of your village, by feeding it soul seeds and defending it from nightly attacks. If the tree dies, Ragnarök reigns and it’s game over. However, there’s no permadeath on an individual level — when a player dies, they lose all the soul seeds in their possession, but they’re able to rejoin the village and continue the fight.

This is different from games like Don’t Starve Together and other survival titles, which often use permadeath as the main source of tension.

“We thought, hang on, survival is such a thing that everyone understands,” Maroda said. “As a human, survival is almost in our genes, we understand the concept of survivability. And so what we wanted to do is, how can we broaden that concept to make it appeal to a much larger audience, to make it way more accessible, so that other players can also enjoy this type of game?”

Tribes of Midgard scales in real-time, meaning players can jump in and out, and enemies and resources will automatically adjust to fit the number of people online at any given time. As a tribe progresses, enemies — including the monstrous giants — become more difficult to defeat. There are RPG and inventory-management mechanics, streamlined methods of resource gathering, and an ever-changing ancient environment.

“The worlds of Tribes of Midgard are completely procedural,” Maroda said. “We generate those worlds with a seed every time and they’re quite different. That increases replayability, that increases a lot of the sense of exploration, of not seeing the same thing happening over and over again, same with our modifiers slash ruin system. [These] can have drastic effects on you as a character.”

Maroda and his team began building Tribes of Midgard four years ago, when games like Rust and Don’t Starve Together were peaking. Developers identified three trends that they thought would propel the video game industry forward in the coming years — survival mechanics, team-based multiplayer experiences, and Vikings.

Tribes of Midgard

Norsfell

For the most part, Norsfell’s predictions were on point. As demonstrated by recent releases like Assassins Creed Valhalla and Valheim, Norse mythology is once again all the rage in the video game market — so much that Maroda already sounds tired of explaining how Tribes of Midgard is different from Valheim.

“Those three trends in the end, almost four years later, kind of materialized,” Maroda said. “We saw things like Overwatch being PvP but with a lot more collaboration and cooperation. …And then the Vikings, yeah, everywhere. Valhalla even did it, there’s Thor movies, there is the Loki series now. So we kind of converge, which is great. We foresaw that happening. People at Valheim also kind of foresaw that thing happening and took a similar course.”

Norsfell’s motto is, “forge new genres that bring people together,” and Tribes of Midgard is the manifestation of this mission. It’s due to hit PlayStation 4, PS5 and PC via Steam on July 27th, published by Gearbox. It costs $20 for the standard edition, or $30 for a deluxe version with cosmetic items and two adorable pets. There’s no crossplay at launch, but Norsfell is actively working on that feature.

Maroda hopes the $20 price tag will allow some players to pick up a few copies of the game and give them to friends so they can all play together, all for the price of a single AAA title.

“You can absolutely play Tribes on your own, it’s super fun,” Maroda said. “But I think that the sense of scale that we wanted to have, with both that dichotomy between the giants and the players, really takes hold when you’re 10 players.”

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link

Categories
Game

Viking survival game Valheim just hit a huge milestone

If you’re a PC gamer, you’ve almost certainly heard of Valheim by now. The Viking survival game launched in early access on Steam earlier this month, and ever since its arrival, it seems to be the only thing anyone can talk about. Today, the developers behind Valheim have shared a big win for the game, as it has hit another sales milestone in a very short amount of time.

In a community update today, developer Iron Gate AB announced that Valheim has hit 3 million total sales in a mere 17 days. Just four days ago, Valheim hit 2 million copies sold, so it seems that sales are only picking up for the game.

In all, Iron Gate says that Valheim has secured more than 60,000 “Overwhelmingly Positive” reviews on Steam, which is enough to put it in Steam’s top 250 best reviewed games of all time. Valheim has enjoyed some success on Twitch as well, with more than 20 million hours of gameplay watched according to Iron Gate’s own statistics. At the time of this writing, Valheim is currently holding down 106,000 viewers on Twitch, which is enough to make it the 10th-most viewed game at the moment.

Like many other PC survival games, Valheim will likely spend a considerable amount of time in early access. On Valheim‘s Steam Store page, Iron Gate says that it anticipates early access lasting at least a year, but that depends on the feedback it receives from players and the amount of content it decides to put into the game. From a features perspective, Iron Gate says that Valheim is about 75% complete, while only about 50% of the planned content is finished.

So, at some point in the not-too-distant future, Valheim could offer a lot more content than it does now. We’ll see if Valheim can keep this momentum up, but here 17 days after release, it already appears that Iron Gate has a big hit on its hands.

Repost: Original Source and Author Link