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Microsoft teases Word’s next default font — so we got a designer to weigh in

Big, terrifying changes are afoot: there’s going to be a new default font in Microsoft Word. Please, don’t panic. You can riot, sure, but no panicking.

This decision was announced on Microsoft’s blog. In the piece, the company explains that it has commissioned five different fonts that could potentially replace the current default, Calibri.

The piece itself provides a balanced view of all these different options, going into an admirable amount of depth about why they may be suitable to become Microsoft Word’s next default font.

Unfortunately though, we didn’t see this news on the blog. Instead, we saw it on that bastion of rational discussion, Twitter. Have a look:

Is a social network famous for being one of the most toxic environments on the internet the best place to engage in dialogue about a default font? Yes. Definitely. Why bother even asking that?

Anyway, we decided to ask TNW’s VP of Design, Alexander Griffioen, to wade in with his opinions.

But in order to keep the spirit of Microsoft’s social media post alive, we only showed him the image below and asked him to provide only Tweet-length comments. We’re nothing but precise and fair.

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Tech News

legal experts weigh in on ‘disturbing’ technology

It was recently revealed that in 2017 Microsoft patented a chatbot that, if built, would digitally resurrect the dead. Using AI and machine learning, the proposed chatbot would bring our digital persona back to life for our family and friends to talk to. When pressed on the technology, Microsoft representatives admitted that the chatbot was “disturbing” and that there were currently no plans to put it into production.

Still, it appears that the technical tools and personal data are in place to make digital reincarnations possible. AI chatbots have already passed the “Turing Test”, which means they’ve fooled other humans into thinking they’re human, too. Meanwhile, most people in the modern world now leave behind enough data to teach AI programs about our conversational idiosyncrasies. Convincing digital doubles may be just around the corner.

But there are currently no laws governing digital reincarnation. Your right to data privacy after your death is far from set in stone, and there is currently no way for you to opt-out of being digitally resurrected. This legal ambiguity leaves room for private companies to make chatbots out of your data after you’re dead.

Our research has looked at the surprisingly complex legal question of what happens to your data after you die. At present, and in the absence of specific legislation, it’s unclear