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Game

Bungie sues ‘Destiny 2’ YouTuber who issued almost 100 fake DMCA claims

In December of last year, a YouTuber by the name of Lord Nazo received copyright takedown notices from CSC Global — the brand protection vendor contracted by game creator Bungie — for uploading tracks from their game Destiny 2’s original soundtrack. While some content creators might remove the offending material or appeal the copyright notice, Nazo, whose real name is Nicholas Minor, allegedly made the ill-fated decision to impersonate CSC Global and issue dozens of fake DMCA notices to his fellow creators. As first spotted by The Game Post, Bungie is now suing him for a whopping $7.6 million.

“Ninety-six times, Minor sent DMCA takedown notices purportedly on behalf of Bungie, identifying himself as Bungie’s ‘Brand Protection’ vendor in order to have YouTube instruct innocent creators to delete their Destiny 2 videos or face copyright strikes,” the lawsuit claims, “disrupting Bungie’s community of players, streamers, and fans. And all the while, ‘Lord Nazo’ was taking part in the community discussion of ‘Bungie’s’ takedowns.” Bungie is seeking “damages and injunctive relief” that include $150,000 for each fraudulent copyright claim: a total penalty of $7,650,000, not including attorney’s fees.

The game developer is also accusing Minor of using one of his fake email aliases to send harassing emails to the actual CSC Global with the subject lines such as “You’re in for it now” and “Better start running. The clock is ticking.” Minor also allegedly authored a “manifesto” that he sent to other members of the Destiny 2 community — again, under an email alias — in which he “took credit” for some of his activities. The recipients promptly forwarded the email to Bungie.

As detailed in the lawsuit, Minor appears to have done the bare minimum to cover his tracks: the first batch of fake DMCA notices used the same residential IP address he used to log-in to both his Destiny and Destiny 2 accounts, the latter of which shared the same Lord Nazo username as his YouTube, Twitter and Reddit accounts. He only switched to a VPN on March 27th — following media coverage of the fake DMCA notices. Meanwhile, Minor allegedly continued to log-in to his Destiny account under his original IP address until May.

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Categories
Game

A YouTuber built his own PS5 Slim that’s less than an inch thick

Sony typically follows up its PlayStation consoles with a slim version a few years later, but that time hasn’t come for the PS5 yet. While we all wait for a slimmer PS5 that would fit in small spaces better, a YouTuber called DIY Perks already built one for himself. He took apart a standard PlayStation 5 and replaced everything that needed to be replaced to get rid of the console’s bulk. He substituted components with similar parts and his own home-made creations, including the console’s rather voluminous casing, to come up with a device that’s just 1.9 centimeters thick.

Putting the current device’s power supply and cooling system with the rest of the console’s components wouldn’t yield a “slim” version of the PS5, though. So, what Perks did was build his own water-cooling system and put the power supply in a long, slim external case that can be placed behind the TV, where it won’t be noticeable. While he did run into some issues that took time to solve, he was able to make the console work in the end. His cooling system was even more efficient than the the standard PS5’s, based on the temperatures he took when he tested it out using Horizon Forbidden West

Unfortunately, Perks’ PS5 Slim is one of a kind and not easy to replicate. You can check out his process in the video below if you need ideas or just want to be awed.

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Computing

YouTuber Builds Custom PC Cooled Solely by Jägermeister

Ah, crazy PC builds. We’ve seen a PC that comes with its own set of lungs, a mini build crammed inside a Sega Dreamcast, and just about everything in between. We’ve never seen anything like this, though. Kyle Hansen, the head of YouTube channel Bitwit, just pulled back the curtain on a PC cooled entirely by Jägermeister.

Bitwit filled the custom water cooling loop, at least for the purposes of a video sponsored by Jägermeister, entirely with the iconic German digestif. Although it’s not the ideal way to cool a PC, the Ryzen 9 5950X at the heart of the build only peaked at around 57 degrees Celsius in a loop of Cinebench R23.

It should go without saying, but you absolutely should not cool your PC with Jägermeister, or any other alcohol for that matter. “This is not a safe, sustainable, or sane way to cool your PC,” Hansen said. Drinks like this will corrode the metal fittings in a custom loop over time, and alcohol is known to eat at acrylic when left unchecked. In short, don’t try this at home.

Hansen didn’t leave Jägermeister in the machine, either. After gathering a few numbers, he replaced the drink with a dyed fluid that shouldn’t pose a risk to the parts inside.

And you wouldn’t want to damage the parts inside. This PC is kitted out with the latest and greatest, including 64GB of Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB memory, an EVGA RTX 3080, an AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, and a 1000W 80+ Titanium power supply. All of the parts went inside a custom Singularity Spectre 3.0 case, outfitted with green metal bits and a Jägermeister logo on the side.

The Spectre 3.0 is known for being a showcase water cooling chassis, and it carries a price to match. Even in a standard black configuration, it runs $1,400.

Similar to the components, the custom water cooling loop is outfitted with the highest-end parts. Hansen used an XC7 CPU block from Corsair, EK’s Quantum Vector GPU block, and two 360mm Primochill radiators.

Although it’s one of the most interesting builds we’ve ever seen, it’s important to reiterate that you should not put any alcohol in your PC, unless it’s just a dab to clean some thermal paste off your CPU. Frankly, the coolant performed better than expected in a short timespan, but over the long term, you’ll have a corroded water cooling loop that’s just waiting to fail.

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Tech News

Xiaomi Mi 11 durability impresses YouTuber

Xiaomi has just launched its early 2021 flagship in and, unsurprisingly, it checks off most of the boxes in terms of specs. The more impressive detail, however, is its price, which is lower than its premium peers, depending on the market and currency conversions, of course. Those details won’t matter, though, if the phone crashes and burns at the smallest accident. JerryRigEverything puts the Xiaomi Mi 11 to find out if that’s the case and it’s not hard to see why he walked away satisfied.

The scratch test has almost become just as boring as the burn test, given how most smartphones use the same materials these days. That said, one aspect of the test has become even more important now that fingerprint scanners are found beneath the display. Given how Zack Nelson’s often-wrecked thumb managed to unlock the phone most of the time, owners of the Mi 11 might have nothing to worry about if the screen gets a few scratches there.

The bend test might have caused the YouTuber’s heart to skip a beat. There was an unnerving and worrying cracking sound but it was only just that. The phone did flex just a wee bit but it remained whole and operational.

Granted, many other phones survived these durability tests but the Xiaomi Mi 11 stands out for two reasons. For one, Nelson says that it is one of the rare few from the Chinese brand that actually survived the bend test, earning a place on his Survivors’ Shelf.

The other reason isn’t exactly related to its durability. The phone may be as durable as, say, a Galaxy S21 Ultra or an iPhone 12 but, at 749 EUR (roughly $870), the Xiaomi Mi 11 also costs a lot less, making it a Pro in non-Pro’s clothing in Nelson’s book.

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